hydraulics

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Related to Hydraulic automata: hydraulic system, Hydraulic pressure

hy·drau·lics

 (hī-drô′lĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The physical science and technology of the static and dynamic behavior of fluids.

hydraulics

(haɪˈdrɒlɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) another name for fluid mechanics

hy•drau•lics

(haɪˈdrɔ lɪks, -ˈdrɒl ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the science that deals with the laws governing water or other liquids in motion and their applications in engineering; practical or applied hydrodynamics.
[1665–75]

hy·drau·lics

(hī-drô′lĭks)
The scientific study of water and other liquids, their uses in engineering, and the forces and pressures associated with them.

hydraulics

1. the science concerned with the laws governing water and other liquids in motion and their engineering applications.
2. applied or practical hydrodynamics.
See also: Physics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydraulics - study of the mechanics of fluidshydraulics - study of the mechanics of fluids  
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
hydrostatics - study of the mechanical properties of fluids that are not in motion
hydrodynamics, hydrokinetics - study of fluids in motion
Translations
عِلْم المِياه والسَّوائِل
hydraulika
hydraulik
hidraulika
vökvafræîi
hydraulika
hidrolik bilimi

hydraulics

[haɪˈdrɒlɪks] NSINGhidráulica f

hydraulics

[haɪˈdrɒlɪks] nhydraulique f

hydraulics

n singHydraulik f

hydraulics

[haɪˈdrɒlɪks] nsgidraulica

hydraulic

(haiˈdroːlik) adjective
1. worked by the pressure of water or some other liquid. hydraulic brakes.
2. relating to hydraulics. a hydraulic engineer.
hyˈdraulically adverb
hyˈdraulics noun singular
the study of the behaviour of moving liquids (eg of water in pipes).
References in periodicals archive ?
Rene Descartes, we're told, developed his philosophy partly as a result of watching hydraulic automata and, 150 years or so later, aristocrats brought up on mechanical philosophy flirted with automata as an ideal of civility and power.
While the three images excerpted from Fontana's 1590 publication recounting his engineering extravaganza are among the most arresting in the entire book, Sawday's account of Montaigne's "delight in machinery" (46) and his captivation by the hydraulic automata in gardens at Tivoli and Pratolino comes as the biggest surprise.