hydrofoil

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hy·dro·foil

 (hī′drə-foil′)
n.
1. A winglike structure attached to the hull of a boat that raises all or part of the hull out of the water when the boat is moving forward, thus reducing drag.
2. A boat equipped with hydrofoils. Also called hydroplane.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrofoil

(ˈhaɪdrəˌfɔɪl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a fast light vessel the hull of which is raised out of the water on one or more pairs of fixed vanes
2. (Nautical Terms) any of these vanes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•dro•foil

(ˈhaɪ drəˌfɔɪl)

n.
1. a surface form creating a thrust against water in a direction perpendicular to the plane approximated by the surface.
2.
a. a winglike member having this form, designed to lift the hull of a moving vessel.
b. a vessel with hydrofoils.
[1915–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrofoil - a device consisting of a flat or curved piece (as a metal plate) so that its surface reacts to the water it is passing throughhydrofoil - a device consisting of a flat or curved piece (as a metal plate) so that its surface reacts to the water it is passing through; "the fins of a fish act as hydrofoils"
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
2.hydrofoil - a speedboat that is equipped with winglike structures that lift it so that it skims the water at high speeds; "the museum houses a replica of the jet hydroplane that broke the record"
speedboat - a fast motorboat
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kantosiipikantosiipialus
draagvleugeldraagvleugelboot

hydrofoil

[ˈhaɪdrəʊfɔɪl] Nhidroala m, aliscafo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hydrofoil

[ˈhaɪdrəfɔɪl] nhydrofoil m, hydroptère m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hydrofoil

[ˈhaɪdrəˌfɔɪl] naliscafo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Fine, "A numerical nonlinear analysis of the flow around two- and three-dimensional partially cavitating hydrofoils," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol.
axial flow turbojet, recommended limiting my efforts to investigating the properties of reversible hydrofoils, a key element in Smith's design.
According to Taylor, the soft tissues around the forelimbsindicate that they acted as hydrofoils and have been used to support a recently proposed theory that some ichthyosaurs, like present-day penguins, "flew' underwater with their forelimbs and used their tails only for steering.
Unlike the sailboat of children's drawings, the sail is mounted on a spar supported in the water by a pair of hydrofoils. And the mast also differs from the platonic sailboat: it leans toward the sailor (as do the hydrofoils), who would be sitting windward on a float above the keel when the boat achieved its fastest speeds.
For example, the software application can be used to model high-lift wing configurations, biplane wings, double keel and rudder configurations, hydrofoils in shallow water, and sail interactions.
Hydrofoils don't work well until the ship reaches high speed; during medium- and slow-speed operations, the underwater planes just get in the way They add greatly to the ship's drag and can double its draft, creating a hazard in shallow or rocky coastal waters.
As the hub of hydrofoils, catamarans and hundred-foot cruise ships, this blue-collared harbor town has been the gateway to the Greek islands since the 5th century BC.
by beating four other "challengers", using cycling sailors known as "cyclors" to provide pedal power to control their foiling 50-foot (15 metre) catamaran's vast "wing" sail and hydrofoils.
The design of the America's Cup Class hydrofoils is one of the team's most closely guarded secrets, but the general principles are well known.
The most common types of undulating towed vehicles are the Batfish (Quildline Instruments (Canada), the SeaSoar (Chelsea Instruments, UK) and the Scanfish (Macartney A/S Denmark), with hydrofoils that can be controlled through a servomotor connected to a cable that attaches it to the vessel.