nuclear fusion

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nuclear fusion

n
(Nuclear Physics) a reaction in which two nuclei combine to form a nucleus with the release of energy. Sometimes shortened to: fusion Compare nuclear fission See also thermonuclear reaction
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nuclear fusion - a nuclear reaction in which nuclei combine to form more massive nuclei with the simultaneous release of energy
cold fusion - nuclear fusion at or near room temperatures; claims to have discovered it are generally considered to have been mistaken
nuclear reaction - (physics) a process that alters the energy or structure or composition of atomic nuclei
thermonuclear reaction - a nuclear fusion reaction taking place at very high temperatures (as in the sun)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrogen is the most abundant element in our solar system, yet most of it is in our star, the sun, which is a giant hydrogen fusion nuclear reactor.
At the tender age of 9 million years, it has already started shutting down hydrogen fusion in its core, and sometime in the next million years it will blow itself apart in a Type II supernova.
However, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Bethe) Hans Bethe  then worked out some of the more complex nuances of the hydrogen fusion chain, and the evidence of the sun's composition continued to mount up.
Let us say the hydrogen shell heats the core, making it expand and push the hydrogen shell to the exterior; the temperature of the shell would fall below the ignition point, and switch off hydrogen fusion. Then the core would cool, returning the hydrogen shell to the ignition point and switching hydrogen fusion on again.
Brown dwarfs, first seen in 1995, occupy a murky ground between planets and full-fledged stars, lacking the mass needed to sustain hydrogen fusion in their cores.
Both stars in the new binary system are "brown dwarfs," which are stars that are too small in mass to ever become hot enough to ignite hydrogen fusion.