bicarbonate

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Related to Hydrogencarbonate: Ammonium hydrogen carbonate

bi·car·bon·ate

 (bī-kär′bə-nāt′, -nĭt)
n.
The polyatomic anion HCO3- or a compound, such as sodium bicarbonate, containing it.

bicarbonate

(baɪˈkɑːbənɪt; -ˌneɪt)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a salt of carbonic acid containing the ion HCO3; an acid carbonate
2. (Elements & Compounds) (modifier) consisting of, containing, or concerned with the ion HCO3: a bicarbonate compound. Systematic name: hydrogen carbonate
3. (Elements & Compounds) short for bicarbonate of soda

bi•car•bo•nate

(baɪˈkɑr bə nɪt, -ˌneɪt)

n.
a salt of carbonic acid, containing the HCO3− group.
[1810–20]

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kär′bə-nāt′)
The group HCO3 or a compound containing it, such as sodium bicarbonate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bicarbonate - a salt of carbonic acid (containing the anion HCO3) in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced; an acid carbonate
baking soda, bicarbonate of soda, saleratus, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate - a white soluble compound (NaHCO3) used in effervescent drinks and in baking powders and as an antacid
carbonate - a salt or ester of carbonic acid (containing the anion CO3)
potassium acid carbonate, potassium bicarbonate, potassium hydrogen carbonate - a crystalline salt (KHCO3) that is used in baking powder and as an antacid
calcium bicarbonate - a bicarbonate that is a major cause of hard water
magnesium bicarbonate - a bicarbonate that is a major cause of hard water
Translations

bi·car·bon·ate

n. bicarbonato, sal de ácido carbónico, bicarbonato sodico.

bicarbonate

n bicarbonato
References in periodicals archive ?
Lot 11 ATC code A12BA30, Citric acid, Potassium citrate, Potassium hydrogencarbonate, Pharmaceutical form-oral, tabl.
Cursorily categorized there are eight types of water for onsen: simple carbonated hydrogencarbonate chloride sulfate sulfur acidic and radioactive.
If both the pH and the hydrogencarbonate are elevated, the imbalance is metabolic alkalosis, and the "elevator" is going up (see Figure 4) (Pagana & Pagana, 2006).