hylomorphism


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hylomorphism

(ˌhaɪləˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that identifies matter with the first cause of the universe

hylomorphism

the theory derived from Aristotle that every physical object is composed of two principles, an unchanging prime matter and a form deprived of actuality with every substantial change of the object. — hylomorphist, n.hylomorphic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
The foundational philosophical assumptions of human nature in the Church originate with Aristotelian-Thomistic hylomorphism.
The role of neural development in eudaimonia is considered and the benefits of a Thomistic hylomorphism founded on participation in esse are summarized.
In this regard Blake's soul-body conflation has affinities with Aristotelian hylomorphism, which posits the soul as a substantial form that provides shape and purpose to the matter from which it cannot be abstracted.
After his release, he began working on a five-year series of books that, read together, constitute an inner-emigrant response to National Socialism, masked within the rhetoric of seemingly apolitical philosophical and religious topics, ranging from theodicy to beauty to hylomorphism.
Moreover, while Hick's soul-making theodicy assumes a Christian worldview, so that the relationship between evil, pain, suffering, and God's will has been "revealed in Jesus Christ" (Hick, 2010: 261), the term "meaning" has specific significance in hylomorphism as conceived by Muslim thinkers, and especially in Sufi and Shii metaphysics.
The first would be that according to the doctrine of hylomorphism put forward by both Aristotle and Aquinas, matter and form are two principles of being, not separate entities in their own right.
The concept of modulation is crucial to Deleuze's reinterpretation of the history of philosophy, where he employs it to turn against Aristotle's hylomorphism and Kant's transcendental categories, for example.
Aquinas's Ontology of the Material World, Change Hylomorphism, and Material Objects, Oxford University Pres, Oxford, 2014, 237 pp.
Understood within Aristotle's overarching conceptual system of hylomorphism, and .
John Duns Scotus on Parts, Wholes, and Hylomorphism
The hylomorphism of Aristotelian natural philosophy, for example, was adopted by the medieval theologians to help them explore the nature of the sacraments and the hypostatic union.
Inheriting a mistrust and critique of hylomorphism from Gilbert Simondon, Deleuze is critical of the traditional Aristotlean idea of the imposition of form (morphe or eidos) on inert matter (hyle).