Hypatia


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Hy·pa·tia

 (hī-pā′shə, -shē-ə) ad 370?-415.
Neoplatonist philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer who lived and taught in Alexandria. Her prominence and adherence to pagan scholasticism led to her being murdered by a Christian mob.

Hypatia

(haɪˈpeɪʃɪə)
n
(Biography) died 415 ad, Neo-Platonist philosopher and politician, who lectured at Alexandria. She was murdered by a Christian mob

Hy·pa·tia

(hī-pā′shə)
a.d. 370?-415. Greek philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer whose writings on mathematics and astronomy were used as textbooks. She also invented instruments used to view the stars.
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Noun1.Hypatia - Greek philosopher and astronomer; she invented the astrolabe (370-415)
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His most famous books are 'Hypatia' (1853), a novel dealing with the Church in its conflict with Greek philosophy in fifth-century Alexandria, and 'Westward Ho!' (1855) which presents with sympathetic largeness of manner the adventurous side of Elizabethan life.
In spite of the bicycle, however, the drama, which was to be entitled "Hypatia," was now in a fair way to be written, for the poet had met and fallen in love with Gertrude Lindsay, whose almost Grecian features, and some knowledge of the different calculua which she had acquired at Alton, helped him to believe that she was a fit model for his heroine.
Some Australian feminist scholars have taken up Deleuze and Guattari's work to question notions of sexual difference as pre-representation, such as Elizabeth Grosz' s edited collection Becomings (1999a), Ian Buchanan and Claire Colebrook's Deleuze and Feminist Theory (2000) and the special issue of Hypatia 'Going Australian: Reconfiguring Feminism and Philosophy' (2000).
They radiate the pulchritude of such mythological personages as Lilith, Harmonia, Galatea, Psyche, Phryne, Hypatia, Venus, Thetis, and Andromeda, to name just nine of these artists' lugubrious heroines.
Psychological Theory and Women's Development (Cambridge/London, 1982); Margaret Olivia Little, "Seeing and Caring: the Role of Affect in Feminist Moral Epistemology," Hypatia 10, no.
Many famous men and women--philosophers and poets, scientists and artists--were freethinkers: Socrates, Epicurus, Hypatia, Spinoza, Voltaire, Jefferson, Madison, Lincoln, Hume, Kant, Shakespeare, Shelly, Einstein, Bertrand Russell, Simone de Beauvoir, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Robert Ingersoll, Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, Clarence Darrow, Margnret Sanger, John Dewey and others.
In so doing, she expands and generalizes on a strategy she uses quite successfully in her 1990 article "The Moral Significance of Birth" (Hypatia 4:46-65) to show why a personhood approach to abortion need not imply the moral permissibility of infanticide.
"`Fatal Practices': A Feminist Analysis of Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia." Hypatia 14, no.
Within computer science there are several related efforts under way, including Hypatia (hypatia.dcs.qmw.ac.uk) and an archive ACM is scheduled to announce.
He devotes a surprising amount of space to those somewhat absurd products of Victorian polemic, the historical novels Hypatia and Callista.
Characteristically the subjects selected include all significant authors (Horace, Hippolytus of Rome, Hypatia, Iamblichus, et al.) geographical areas such as Spain, doctrinal themes such as homousios (this by G.
Just because Women's History Month is over, don't stop reading about women you know too little about, like Hypatia, Aphra Behn, or Mary Two-Axe Early.