polycystic ovary syndrome

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polycystic ovary syndrome

n. Abbr. PCOS
An endocrine disorder usually associated with multiple cysts within the ovaries and excess levels of androgens, characterized by hirsutism, acne, menstrual irregularity, infertility, and often insulin resistance.

polycystic ovary syndrome

n
(Pathology) a hormonal disorder in which the Graafian follicles in the ovary fail to develop completely so that they are unable to ovulate, remaining as multiple cysts that distend the ovary. The results can include reduced fertility, obesity, and hirsutism. Abbreviation: PCOS
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A second Phase 3 study of volanesorsen has begun in patients with FPL, a rare lipid disorder characterized by abnormal fat distribution across the body and a range of metabolic abnormalities, including severe insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis and, in affected women, features of hyperandrogenism.
After winning her battle against the IAAF's hyperandrogenism clause, which denied her a spot at the last year's Commonwealth and the Asian Games, the Odisha athlete is gearing up for qualification for the Rio Olympics, and judging by her three gold medals at the recent Nationals, Dutee is on the right track.
PCOS is characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligoanovulation, and oligomenorrhea and has been reviewed extensively by P.
Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the development of ovarian hyperandrogenism.
Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy of women of reproductive age, characterised by hyperandrogenism, hyperinsulinaemia, long-term metabolic disturbances and menstrual irregularities, including anovulatory cycles.
BMI-matched healthy women who had regular menses and had no clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism or PCOS were recruited as a control group from the general population.
Chand was diagnosed with hyperandrogenism, a condition which produces high testosterone levels and meant she fell foul of the International Association of Athletics Federation's (IAAF) gender rules.
Although a number of authors suggest that hyperandrogenism, specifically, may be a factor, the increased incidence of HS among women belies this claim, and the evidence available does not support this association.
Normogonadotropic hypogonadism is most frequently associated with hyperandrogenism, as demonstrated by increased testosterone concentrations in this case.
A third patient in our study had stopped growing and developing at 10 years old possibly due to hyperandrogenism, which resulted in negative feedback and reduced growth hormone secretion.