hypermasculine

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hypermasculine

(ˌhaɪpəˈmæskjʊlɪn)
adj
(Psychology) psychol characterized by an exaggeration of traditionally masculine traits or behaviour
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
My half-right version of the myth lent itself to a convenient narrative: it helps frame a story of corporate greed, of the WWE corporation going public, the commodification of the late 20th-century "WWE attitude" and what that meant to the bodies of the wrestlers--from hypermasculinity to the "wrestler's cocktail": uppers, downers, and 'roids, 'roids, 'roids across a 12-month hiatus-free "season."
Trait aggression and hypermasculinity distinguish perpetrators from victims of male barroom aggression.
Influence of abuse and partner hypermasculinity on the sexual behavior of Latinas.
The male characters' hypermasculinity and concomitant domestic abuse only further destroys the intimate spaces of the family, as characters like Clara and Myra are either killed or forced to abandon their families to flee their aggressors.
Irwin also goes on to discuss the matter of "homosexual panic" in the novel, both in the way in which hypermasculinity masks potentially queer sentiments and in the way in which ridicule of even the slightest queer manifestations in others functions also as such a mask for the one engaging in ridicule.
While Tasker discusses the torture of the physically endowed male protagonist as a testament to his ability to survive while allowing the viewer to marvel at his obvious strength and hypermasculinity, the torture scene in Rambo turns the protagonist's physique grotesque, an object less to be admired than reviled.
Prison staff and personnel expect imprisoned people to conform to notions of hypermasculinity and frequently attempt to force trans people into compliance with these expectations.
Alfredo Nieves Moreno offers an equally intriguing critique of reggaeton's hypermasculinity by explaining how the Puerto Rican duo Calle 13 constantly and creatively "denaturalizes" reggaeton's aesthetic of the "barriocentric macho" in their music and videos through humor and political satire.
Toward the end of Watch This!, Walton asks: "Should we pray for and be deeply concerned and saddened about an unhealthy culture of hypermasculinity and a patriarchal savior complex that possibly helps to cultivate sadomasochistic and misogynistic tendencies?" (227).
It is also closely related to hypermasculinity and hostile masculinity constructs (Malamuth, Sockloski, Koss, & Tanaka, 1991; Murnen et al., 2002), according to which extreme adherence to the masculine sexual role implies acceptance of certain traits (e.g., aggressiveness, dominance, control) as being proper to males.
Termed "blaxploitation" for their gross, spectacular use of violence and sex to bring in their target audience (urban blacks), these films were fantastic me1anges of black radicalism, hypermasculinity, action plots, and racialized stereotypes that, while made to entertain and to wow, were undeniably political and critical.