hyperviscosity

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hyperviscosity

(ˌhaɪpəvɪsˈkɒsətɪ)
n, pl -ties
the abnormal thickening of a liquid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

hyperviscosity

n. hiperviscosidad, viscosidad excesiva.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffusion-weighted and gradient echo magnetic resonance findings of hemichorea-hemiballismus associated with diabetic hyperglycemia: A hyperviscosity syndrome? Arch Neurol 2002;59(3):448-452.
In this situation, the RVO and comparison groups were 1: 5 matched using the PS matching method [20] for age, gender, index year (the year of the index date in the RVOs and the enrollment date in the comparisons), use of antithrombotic drugs, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, hyperviscosity syndrome, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and glaucoma.
Depending on the CML phase and biology, patients may have a profoundly elevated WBC at diagnosis, which can present as leukostasis, or hyperviscosity syndrome. Hyperviscosity syndrome is associated with serious clinical manifestations including visual discomfort (retinopathy, retinal hemorrhages), shortness of breath (pulmonary insufficiency), priapism, and other symptoms related to end organ damage [5,7].
In addition, symptoms due to hyperviscosity syndrome, renal insufficiency, or symptomatic cryoglobulinemia may also be indications for therapy initiation [22].
Roh, "Diffusion-weighted and gradient echo magnetic resonance findings of hemichorea-hemiballismus associated diabetic hyperglycemia: a hyperviscosity syndrome?" Archives of Neurology, vol.
Dyspnea results from hyperviscosity syndrome, hemolytic or other anemias, and/or direct lung involvement including pleural effusion, pulmonary infiltrates, or a mass.
Macroglobulinemia causes hyperviscosity syndrome and lymphoplasmatic infiltration of the tissues and bone marrow.35 Association of macroglobulinemia and malabsorption is rare.
Based on clinical signs and history of severe lymphocytosis, hyperviscosity syndrome secondary to severe blood hypercellularity was suspected.
A hyperviscosity syndrome may also be seen in association with ovarian cancer which favours thrombosis and may accelerate tumour progression and metastasis.DVT is a recognised complicating factor of ovarian cancer which may adversely affect the course of the disease possibly as a component of this hyperviscosity syndrome (5,6) Ovarian cancer patients are also vulnerable to developing cerebrovascular complications and carry a higher risk of developing ischaemic strokes which has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality.
Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstr?m's macroglobulinemia, which is treated with plasmapheresis and chemotherapy.
Evidence-based focused review of management of hyperviscosity syndrome. Blood 2012;119:2205-8.
Characteristic symptoms of hyperviscosity syndrome include mucosal bleeding, visual disturbance, and headache.