hyperviscosity

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hyperviscosity

(ˌhaɪpəvɪsˈkɒsətɪ)
n, pl -ties
the abnormal thickening of a liquid
Translations

hyperviscosity

n. hiperviscosidad, viscosidad excesiva.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dyspnea results from hyperviscosity syndrome, hemolytic or other anemias, and/or direct lung involvement including pleural effusion, pulmonary infiltrates, or a mass.
Macroglobulinemia causes hyperviscosity syndrome and lymphoplasmatic infiltration of the tissues and bone marrow.
Based on clinical signs and history of severe lymphocytosis, hyperviscosity syndrome secondary to severe blood hypercellularity was suspected.
A hyperviscosity syndrome may also be seen in association with ovarian cancer which favours thrombosis and may accelerate tumour progression and metastasis.
Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstr?
Evidence-based focused review of management of hyperviscosity syndrome.
Characteristic symptoms of hyperviscosity syndrome include mucosal bleeding, visual disturbance, and headache.
A Patients with hyperviscosity syndrome have always been a challenge when it comes to laboratory testing.
Ocular symptoms in leukemia patients may be due to the direct effect of leukemic cells on ocular tissues or secondary to such disease-related complications as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and hyperviscosity syndrome (1).
Cryoglobulinemia (CG) may present with a hyperviscosity syndrome and/or small vessel vasculitis.
In COPD there are noted: updates in rheologic features of blood by a type of hyperviscosity syndrome leading to disorders of pulmonary and myocardial microcirculation; state of ventilation, hemodynamic and tissue hypoxia; formation of secondary arterial pulmonary hypertension that reinforces pressure on right section of the heart and, therefore, increases a need of myocardium in oxygen, restricts coronary fraction of cardiac output and aggravates myocardial ischemia of both ventricles that results in progression of cardio-pulmonary failure (Chuchalina, 2003).