hypnosis

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hyp·no·sis

 (hĭp-nō′sĭs)
n. pl. hyp·no·ses (-sēz)
1. An artificially induced altered state of consciousness, characterized by heightened suggestibility and receptivity to direction.
2. Hypnotism.
3. A sleeplike condition.

[New Latin hypnōsis, from Greek hupnoun, to put to sleep; see hypnotic.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hypnosis

(hɪpˈnəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Psychology) an artificially induced state of relaxation and concentration in which deeper parts of the mind become more accessible: used clinically to reduce reaction to pain, to encourage free association, etc. See also autohypnosis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hyp•no•sis

(hɪpˈnoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. an artificially induced trance state resembling sleep, characterized by heightened susceptibility to suggestion.
[1875–80; hypn (otic) + -osis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyp·no·sis

(hĭp-nō′sĭs)
A trance-like state resembling sleep in which a person becomes very responsive to suggestions from another. Hypnosis is brought on by having one fix one's attention on a particular object, and it can be self-induced through concentration and relaxation.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hypnosis

See also psychology.

1. the process of hypnotizing oneself.
2. the resulting state.
1. animal magnetism, or the power that enables some people to induce a hypnotic state in others.
2. physical attraction between members of opposite sexes. — biomagnetic, adj.
psychoanalysis of a patiënt while he is under hypnosis. — hypnoanalytic, hypnoanalytical, adj.
the process of inducing a state of hypnosis. — hypnogenetic, adj.
psychotherapy employing hypnosis. — hypnotherapeutic, adj.
the science that studies hypnosis and the process of inducing a hypnotic state. — hypnotist, n.
1. hypnosis as induced by Dr. F. A. Mesmer through “animal magnetism,” a 19th-century therapy.
2. hypnotism.
3. a compelling attraction; fascination. — mesmerization, n. — mesmerist, mesmerizer, n.
an obsession with hypnosis.
the focusing of the attention on a single thing, especially as a result of hypnosis.
hypnosis with the aid of drugs.
the theory of od, a hypothetical force formerly held to pervade all nature and to reveal itself in magnetism, mesmerism, chemical action, etc. — odylic, adj.
Rare. the state of being in a hypnotic trance.
a state of sleep induced by hypnosis or mesmerism. — somnipathist, n.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hypnosis

Commonly used in hypnotherapy, this is an altered state of consciousness that can be induced by the self or by another person and during which conscious control is relaxed, making the contents of the unconscious more accessible. Hypnosis is from the Greek word “hypnos,” meaning “sleep.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypnosis - a state that resembles sleep but that is induced by suggestionhypnosis - a state that resembles sleep but that is induced by suggestion
self-hypnosis - hypnosis induced by yourself
mental condition, mental state, psychological condition, psychological state - (psychology) a mental condition in which the qualities of a state are relatively constant even though the state itself may be dynamic; "a manic state"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نَوْم مِغْناطيسي
hypnóza
hypnose
hipnózis
dáleiîsla
hipnotizavimashipnotizuotihipnotizuotojashipnozėhipnozės
hipnoze
hypnóza
hipnozyapay uyku

hypnosis

[hɪpˈnəʊsɪs] N (hypnoses (pl)) [hɪpˈnəʊsiːz]hipnosis f
she revealed under hypnosis thatbajo los efectos de la hipnosis reveló que ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hypnosis

[hɪpˈnəʊsɪs] nhypnose f
under hypnosis → sous hypnose
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hypnosis

nHypnose f; under hypnosisunter or in Hypnose, in hypnotisiertem Zustand
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hypnosis

[hɪpˈnəʊsɪs] nipnosi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hypnosis

(hipˈnəusis) noun
a sleep-like state caused by the action of another person who can then make the sleeper obey his commands.
hypˈnotic (-ˈno-) adjective
ˈhypnotize, ˈhypnotise verb
1. to put in a state of hypnosis. The hypnotist hypnotized three people from the audience.
2. to fascinate completely. Her beauty hypnotized him.
ˈhypnotism noun
the art of producing hypnosis.
ˈhypnotist noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

hyp·no·sis

n. hipnosis, estado sugestivo durante el cual la persona sometida responde a mandatos siempre que estos no contradigan convicciones arraigadas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypnosis

n hipnosis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The system uses sensors and a monitor to record the patient's encephalogram (EEG) and bispectral index (BIS), a parameter without units that measures hypnotic state and relates this to the patient's level of consciousness.
"I remembered everything that we talked about when I was in a hypnotic state and knew I could break the trance if I wanted to."
He puts Julia in a hypnotic state and while in a trance, she witnesses her own death in a staged out-of-body experience.
Its journey might be pointless, but the perpetual movement induces a hypnotic state.
The hypnotic state was induced by the first author, a medical doctor with more than 15 years of experience in clinical hypnosis.
The authors characterize the hypnotic state as similar to a light trance or day-dream something everyone experiences without realizing it.
Spiegel helped the panting, disheveled girl marshal her imagination to induce a relaxed, hypnotic state of mind.
But when I was feeling more relaxed it washed over me and I felt so laid back at the end it was like coming out of a hypnotic state.HHH
He considers film-watching close to a hypnotic state, an "endlessly fascinating journey into your emotions." A film that doesn't move people to laugh or cry is "meaningless." The secret is to "open the wound of the story," and a film that fails to do that is a failure.
Is there a difference between being in "trance" and being in a "hypnotic state"?
Private practitioner Sue, who is also a community midwife at James Cook University Hospital, explains that through a day-long workshop followed by lots of regular practice "you learn how to put yourself into a relaxed state of mind, leading to an hypnotic state."
A verbatim protocol for the "hypnoreflexogenous" method of preparation for childbirth is presented wherein the patient is taught to enter a hypnotic state and then prepared for labor and delivery.