hypostyle

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Related to Hypostyle Hall: Corbeled arch

hy·po·style

 (hī′pə-stīl′)
adj.
Having a roof or ceiling supported by rows of columns.
n.
A building with a roof or ceiling supported by rows of columns.

[From Greek hupostūlos, resting upon pillars : hupo-, hypo- + stūlos, pillar; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

hypostyle

(ˈhaɪpəʊˌstaɪl)
adj
(Architecture) having a roof supported by columns
n
(Architecture) a building constructed in this way

hy•po•style

(ˈhaɪ pəˌstaɪl)
adj.
1. having a roof or ceiling supported by many columns.
n.
2. a hypostyle structure.
[1825–35; < Greek hypóstȳlos resting on pillars =hypo- hypo- + -stȳlos -style2]

hypostyle

A thickly pillared hall, especially in ancient Egypt, in which the roof rests directly on the columns.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From enjoying the grandeur of the Saharan Dunes to feeling minute in Karnak's towering hypostyle hall, a four-day Nile trip is still one of the greatest cruise journeys in the world.
A view of the Nile at dusk from the deck of the Sun Boat IV (above), columns depicting the Goddess Hathor in the Temple of Hathor, Denderah (right) and the Great Hypostyle Hall, temple of Karnak (below) | A view of the Nile at dusk from the deck of the Sun Boat IV (above), columns depicting the Goddess Hathor in the Temple of Hathor, Denderah (right) and the Great Hypostyle Hall, temple of Karnak (below)
The sanctuary, the rooms surrounding it, and the inner hypostyle hall fronting the sanctuary were the first to be built, under King Ptolemy XII in the middle of the first century B.
Its Great Hypostyle Hall is large enough swallow St Paul's Cathedral in London TWICE.
Spanish UNIFIL soldiers then handed him a model of the Hypostyle Hall of the Mosque of Cordoba in honor of his visit.
Oversized cylinders create a hypostyle hall out of the baggage reclaim and columns vary in size, reflecting the forces bearing onto them from above.
The Hypostyle Hall is a stupendous riot of black and white marble columns, gilded plasterwork and aquamarine walls.
The porticus Aemilia (193 BC), inspired by the Hypostyle Hall of Delos, and the porticus Metelli (circa 147 BC), based on the architecture of Hellenistic religious sanctuaries, are examples of the popularity of the new Hellenistic styles before Cleopatra.
Marvel at the Great Hypostyle Hall - 134 massive columns with fantastic stone carvings.
So it seems that it was more down to geology, rather than aesthetics, that the temple's famous Great Hypostyle Hall was filled with more than 130 giant columns.
One of the most overpowering sights of the temple is the Hypostyle Hall, an organised forest of gigantic engraved columns, each one so large it takes the outstretched arms of six people to encircle it.