hysteresis

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Related to Hysteresis losses: Eddy current

hys·ter·e·sis

 (hĭs′tə-rē′sĭs)
n. pl. hys·ter·e·ses (-sēz)
The lagging of an effect behind its cause, as when the change in magnetism of a body lags behind changes in the magnetic field.

[Greek husterēsis, a shortcoming, from husterein, to come late, from husteros, late; see ud- in Indo-European roots.]

hys′ter·et′ic (-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

hysteresis

(ˌhɪstəˈriːsɪs)
n
(General Physics) physics the lag in a variable property of a system with respect to the effect producing it as this effect varies, esp the phenomenon in which the magnetic flux density of a ferromagnetic material lags behind the changing external magnetic field strength
[C19: from Greek husterēsis coming late, from husteros coming after]
hysteretic adj
ˌhysterˈetically adv

hys•ter•e•sis

(ˌhɪs təˈri sɪs)

n.
a lag in response exhibited by a body in reacting to changes in forces, esp. magnetic forces, acting upon it.
[1795–1805; < Greek hystérēsis deficiency, state of being behind or late =hysterē-, variant s. of hystereîn to come late, lag behind, v. derivative of hýsteros coming behind + -sis -sis]
hys`ter•et′ic (-ˈrɛt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hysteresis - the lagging of an effect behind its causehysteresis - the lagging of an effect behind its cause; especially the phenomenon in which the magnetic induction of a ferromagnetic material lags behind the changing magnetic field
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
Translations
hystereesi
hystérèsehystérésis
heldnisegulheldni
isterisi
히스테리시스
References in periodicals archive ?
Hysteresis losses irreversibly convert to heat when an elastomer is dynamically stressed.
Eddy currents and hysteresis losses are negligible and the induced EMF is sinusoidal.
As we have seen in paragraphs concerning suspension, shock absorbers create heat as they absorb mechanical energy, while hysteresis losses in rubber components such as tires and rubber-bushed and rubber-padded tracks all generate heat energy.