I Ching

(redirected from I-tsing)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

I Ching

 (ē jĭng)
n.
A Chinese book of ancient origin consisting of 64 interrelated hexagrams along with commentaries attributed to Confucius. The hexagrams, originally used for divination, embody Taoist philosophy by describing all nature and human endeavor in terms of the interaction of yin and yang. Also called Book of Changes.

[Mandarin Yì Jīng, Book of Changes, from Middle Chinese jiajk kjiajŋ : jiajk, change + kjiajŋ, warp (of a loom), to pass through, classic (text), book.]

I Ching

(ˈiː ˈtʃɪŋ)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) an ancient Chinese book of divination and a source of Confucian and Taoist philosophy. Answers to questions and advice may be obtained by referring to the text accompanying one of 64 hexagrams, selected at random. Also called: Book of Changes

I Ching

(ˈi ˈdʒɪŋ)
n.
an ancient Chinese book of divination, in which 64 pairs of trigrams are shown with various interpretations.

I Ching

An ancient Chinese text (also known as the Book of Changes) from which one’s fortune can be predicted.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the world came to know about the conditions of ancient India through the writings of Chinese writers Fa-Hien, Huen-Tsang and I-Tsing, it was Marco Polo, who threw light on the Silk Road that led to China and Mongolia.
German translation by Johannes Nobel, Suvarnaprabhasottamasutra: Das Goldglanz-Sutra, ein Sanskrittext des Mahayana-Buddhismus: I-tsing's chinesische Version und ihre Ubersetzung, i: I-tsing's chinesische Version (Leiden: E.
Nobel, in his notes to his German translation of Yijing's Chinese (henceforth abbreviated as I-tsing), provides, where he considers relevant, some of the wording used in two Tibetan translations: Tib.
In the context of this Harivamsa hymn, I cannot agree with Nobel's suggestion that the term Narayani has a folk element to it (I-tsing, 249, n.
August Barth, CEuvres de Auguste Barth, IV: Comptes rendus et notices (1887-1898) (Paris: Ernest Leroux, 1918), 453, expressed this opinion as early as 1898: "I-tsing [Yijing] parait avoir eu une assez bonne connaissance pratique du sanscrit."
Yijing's Chinese was previously translated by Nobel into German (I-tsing, 250-56), and the Harivamsa hymn was rendered into English by Coburn (Devi-Mahatmya, 279-81) and into French by Andre Couture (Krishna, 353-55).
In Yijing's line, it is also possible to understand wangxi xianren [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] together, as Nobel (I-tsing, 250) has done: "die fruheren Seher" ("the ancient seers").
Nobel (I-tsing, 250) translates congming [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as "die schnelle Auffassungsgabe" ("quick understanding") and claims there is no Sanskrit correspondent, suggesting that it is doubtful whether samnati is correct--presumably as a match for congming ("Es ist zweifelhaft, ob samnati richtig ist.").
As Nobel (I-tsing, 250) translates them: "Schamhaftigkeit."
My interpretation of this line differs from Nobel's (I-tsing, 250).
Nobel, (I-tsing, 251) translates zhangyang [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as "das volle Gedeihen" ("full prosperity") and hence equates it with pusti; tiaofu [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as "die vollstandig Bezahmung" ("complete restraint") and suggests it corresponds to vijaya.
Even though M[bar{a}]trceta was a Mah[bar{a}]y[bar{a}]nist, one major feature of the VAV and the PPU (already noted by I-tsing and T[bar{a}]ran[bar{a}]tha) is that "die Hymnen keine Bevorzugung von Mah[bar{a}]y[bar{a}]na oder H[bar{i}]nay[bar{a}]na erkennen lassen und daber f[ddot{u}]r die Anh[ddot{a}]nger beider grosser Richtungen des Buddhismus gleichermassen annehmbar waren" (p.