international unit

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international unit

n. Abbr. IU
1. The quantity of a biologically active substance, such as a hormone or vitamin, required to produce a specific response.
2. A unit of potency for similarly active substances, based on this quantity and accepted as an international standard.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in′terna′tional u′nit


n.
1. an internationally accepted standard, derived by bioassay, to which samples of a pharmaceutical substance are compared for ascertaining their relative potency.
2. the specific biologically effective quantity of such a substance.
Abbr.: IU
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

international unit

A unit for measuring a biologically active substance, such as a hormone or vitamin.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

International unit

n. unidad internacional, medida de una sustancia definida aceptada por la Conferencia Internacional de Unificación de Fórmulas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In studies, the elderly who used E (400 I.U.) and C (1,000 mg) were less likely to catch flu viruses or die from them.
In the United States, the average, daily intake of vitamin A through food--especially fish, eggs, and meat--is roughly 2,600 international units (I.U.) for men, and many multivitamins contain 5,000 I.U.
calcium and 800 I.U. of vitamin D, according to FORE.