silk

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silk

 (sĭlk)
n.
1.
a. A fine lustrous fiber composed mainly of fibroin and produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons, especially the strong, elastic, fibrous secretion of silkworms used to make thread and fabric.
b. Thread or fabric made from this fiber.
c. A garment made from this fabric.
2.
a. A silky filamentous material spun by a spider or an insect such as a webspinner.
b. A silky filamentous material produced by a plant, such as the styles forming a tuft on an ear of corn.
3. silks The brightly colored identifying garments of a jockey or harness driver.
adj.
Composed of or similar to the fiber or the fabric silk.
intr.v. silked, silk·ing, silks
To develop silk. Used of corn.

[Middle English, from Old English sioloc, probably of Slavic origin (akin to Old Church Slavonic šelkŭ), ultimately from Greek sērikon, neuter of sērikos, silken; see serge1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

silk

(sɪlk)
n
1. (Zoology) the very fine soft lustrous fibre produced by a silkworm to make its cocoon
2. (Textiles)
a. thread or fabric made from this fibre
b. (as modifier): a silk dress.
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a garment made of this
4. (Zoology) a very fine fibre produced by a spider to build its web, nest, or cocoon
5. (Botany) the tuft of long fine styles on an ear of maize
6. (Law)
a. the gown worn by a Queen's (or King's) Counsel
b. informal a Queen's (or King's) Counsel
c. take silk to become a Queen's (or King's) Counsel
vb
(Botany) (intr) US and Canadian (of maize) to develop long hairlike styles
[Old English sioluc; compare Old Norse silki, Greek sērikon, Korean sir; all ultimately from Chinese ssǔ silk]
ˈsilkˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

silk

(sɪlk)

n.
1. the soft, lustrous fiber obtained as a filament from the cocoon of the silkworm.
2. thread made from this fiber.
3. cloth made from this fiber.
4. a garment of this cloth.
5. a gown of such material worn by a King's or Queen's Counsel at the English bar.
6. Brit. Informal. a King's or Queen's Counsel.
7. silks, the blouse and peaked cap, considered together, worn by a jockey or sulky driver.
8. any fiber or filamentous matter resembling silk, as a filament produced by certain spiders or the thread of a mollusk.
9. the hairlike styles on an ear of corn.
adj.
10. made of silk.
11. of, pertaining to, or resembling silk.
v.i.
12. (of corn) to be in the course of developing silk.
Idioms:
hit the silk, Slang. to parachute from an aircraft.
[before 900; Old English sioloc, seol(o)c, ultimately < Greek sērikós silken, literally, Chinese, derivative of Sêres the Chinese; compare sericeous]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

silk

(sĭlk)
1. A fiber produced by silkworms to form cocoons. Silk is strong, flexible, and fibrous, and is essentially a long continuous strand of protein. It is widely used to make thread and fabric.
2. A substance similar to the silk of the silkworm but produced by other insect larvae and by spiders to spin webs.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

silk

  • floss - A word for untwisted filaments of silk used in making embroidery or satin.
  • lame - A material consisting of silk or other yarns interwoven with metallic threads.
  • scroop - The rustle of silk.
  • tabby - The common tabby cat derives its name from silk with a wavy pattern, from Arabic utabi, the name of the quarter in Baghdad where the silk was made.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

silk


Past participle: silked
Gerund: silking

Imperative
silk
silk
Present
I silk
you silk
he/she/it silks
we silk
you silk
they silk
Preterite
I silked
you silked
he/she/it silked
we silked
you silked
they silked
Present Continuous
I am silking
you are silking
he/she/it is silking
we are silking
you are silking
they are silking
Present Perfect
I have silked
you have silked
he/she/it has silked
we have silked
you have silked
they have silked
Past Continuous
I was silking
you were silking
he/she/it was silking
we were silking
you were silking
they were silking
Past Perfect
I had silked
you had silked
he/she/it had silked
we had silked
you had silked
they had silked
Future
I will silk
you will silk
he/she/it will silk
we will silk
you will silk
they will silk
Future Perfect
I will have silked
you will have silked
he/she/it will have silked
we will have silked
you will have silked
they will have silked
Future Continuous
I will be silking
you will be silking
he/she/it will be silking
we will be silking
you will be silking
they will be silking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been silking
you have been silking
he/she/it has been silking
we have been silking
you have been silking
they have been silking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been silking
you will have been silking
he/she/it will have been silking
we will have been silking
you will have been silking
they will have been silking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been silking
you had been silking
he/she/it had been silking
we had been silking
you had been silking
they had been silking
Conditional
I would silk
you would silk
he/she/it would silk
we would silk
you would silk
they would silk
Past Conditional
I would have silked
you would have silked
he/she/it would have silked
we would have silked
you would have silked
they would have silked
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silk - a fabric made from the fine threads produced by certain insect larvaesilk - a fabric made from the fine threads produced by certain insect larvae
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
sarcenet, sarsenet - a fine soft silk fabric often used for linings
2.silk - animal fibers produced by silkworms and other larvae that spin cocoons and by most spiders
animal fiber, animal fibre - fiber derived from animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ثَوب حَريريحَريرحَرِير
hedvábí
silke
silkki
svila
silki
비단
kaip šilkasšilkasšilkaverpisšilkinisšvelnus kaip šilkas
zīda-zīds
hodváb
svila
siden
ไหม
lụa tơ tằm

silk

[sɪlk]
A. N
1.seda f
2. (Brit) (Jur) (= barrister) → abogado/a m/f superior
to take silk (Brit) → ser ascendido a la abogacía superior QC/KC
B. silks NPL (Racing) → colores mpl
C. CPD [blouse, scarf] → de seda
you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's earaunque la mona se vista de seda, mona se queda
silk finish N with a silk finish (cloth, paintwork) → satinado
silk hat Nsombrero m de copa
silk industry Nindustria f sedera
silk thread Nhilo m de seda
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

silk

[ˈsɪlk]
nsoie f
modif [blouse, dress, handkerchief, pyjamas, sheets, stockings, tie] → en soie; [flowers] → en soie
a silk scarf → un foulard en soiesilk route n
the silk route → la route de la soiesilk-screen print silkscreen print [ˈsɪlkskriːn] nsérigraphie fsilk-screen printing silkscreen printing [ˈsɪlkskriːn] nsérigraphie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

silk

n
Seide f; (= silk dress)Seidene(s) nt, → Seidenkleid nt; dressed in beautiful silksin herrliche Seidengewänder gekleidet; dressed in silks and satinsin Samt und Seide (gekleidet)
(Brit, Jur, = barrister) → Kronanwalt m/-anwältin f; (= gown)Seidengewand nt; to take silkKronanwalt werden
silks pl (= racing colours)(Renn)farben pl
adjSeiden-, seiden; silk tieSeidenkrawatte f; the dress is silkdas Kleid ist aus Seide; you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear (Prov) → aus einem Ackergaul kann man kein Rennpferd machen (prov)

silk

:
silk moth
silk screen
nSeidensieb nt; (also silk-screen printing)Seidensiebdruck m
silk stocking
silk-stocking
adj (US) → vornehm
silkworm
nSeidenraupe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

silk

[sɪlk]
1. nseta
2. adj (blouse, stockings) → di seta; (industry) → della seta
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

silk

(silk) noun
1. very fine, soft threads made by silkworms.
2. thread, cloth etc made from this. The dress was made of silk; (also adjective) a silk dress.
ˈsilky adjective
soft, fine and rather shiny like silk.
ˈsilkiness noun
ˈsilkworm noun
the caterpillar of certain moths, which makes silk.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

silk

حَرِير hedvábí silke Seide μετάξι seda silkki soie svila seta 비단 zijde silke jedwab seda шелк siden ไหม ipek lụa tơ tằm 丝绸
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

silk

n seda
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mechanism behind ILD in RA is poorly understood, but there are certain risk factors believed to play an important role.
The hazard ratio for development of clinically evident ILD in RA (Compared to individuals without RA) was 8.96.
If a UIP pattern is noted on HRCT and/ or histopathology, a diagnosis of IPF is made when no "secondary" causes for the ILD can be identified after a reasonably diligent history, physical examination, and laboratory investigation.
"Vitamin D deficiency is independently associated with subclinical ILD and its progression, based on both increased high-attenuation areas and interstitial lung abnormalities, in a community-based population," the authors write.
ILD, which has eight staff, was founded in 2010 and has an annual turnover of around PS500,000.
delivering training that industry's performance and enhances is a very and in g our everyone was in the of ILD by Accountants corporate finance director Fish with legal advice Endeavour Partnership led that will benefit existing new customers, here North East afield, will be tap more range t e training TTE." Mr was a work with the TTE on this acquisition, sees them further their offering for the These are exciting times for TTE as it looks to further build on its exceptional reputation.
In those patients where there was possibility of diseases other than ILD bronchoscopy with lavage +- biopsy was done.
Our result that TAZ expression levels were higher in cellular-type than fibrotic-type NSIP suggests an important role of TAZ in the more dynamic inflammatory phase of ILD in addition to irreversible fibrotic phase.
(14) and ILD was confirmed by histopathology or by the detection of interstitial infiltrates after chest radiography (X-ray generator, 0.6/1.2 P324DK-125, Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto, Japan, and X-ray photoreceiver, flat panel detector CALNEO-U, Fujifilm Medical, Tokyo, Japan) or high-resolution computed tomography (CT, Aquilion ONE TSX-301C/3A, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara City, Tochigi-ken Japan).
* ILD refers to a group of disorders that primarily affects the pulmonary interstitium, rather than the alveolar spaces or pleura.
Studied for centuries, clubbing has been associated with a variety of pulmonary diseases, including infections, ILD, and neoplasms [5].