electromagnetic spectrum

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electromagnetic spectrum
electromagnetic spectrum frequencies in hertz
A. gamma rays
B. x-rays
C. ultraviolet rays
D. visible light
E. infrared rays
F. microwaves
G. radio waves

electromagnetic spectrum

n.
The entire range of electromagnetic radiation, which includes, in order of increasing frequency and decreasing wavelength, radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, x-rays, and gamma rays.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electromagnetic spectrum

n
(General Physics) the complete range of electromagnetic radiation from the longest radio waves (wavelength 105 metres) to the shortest gamma radiation (wavelength 10–13 metre)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

elec′tromagnet′ic spec′trum


n.
the entire continuous spectrum of all forms of electromagnetic radiation, from gamma rays to long radio waves.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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electromagnetic spectrum
The electromagnetic spectrum can be measured in frequencies or in wavelengths. This diagram measures wavelengths in meters, ranging from the longest wavelengths (radio waves) to the shortest (gamma rays). Visible light, which is a band of colors from red to violet, is the only portion of the spectrum that can be seen by the human eye.

electromagnetic spectrum

The entire range of electromagnetic radiation. At one end of the spectrum are gamma rays, which have the shortest wavelengths and high frequencies. At the other end are radio waves, which have the longest wavelengths and low frequencies. Visible light, with intermediate wavelengths and frequencies, is near the center of the spectrum.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electromagnetic spectrum

The range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation from zero to infinity. It is divided into 26 alphabetically designated bands. See also electronic warfare.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electromagnetic spectrum - the entire frequency range of electromagnetic waves
radio frequency - an electromagnetic wave frequency between audio and infrared
extremely low frequency, ELF - below 3 kilohertz
very low frequency, VLF - 3 to 30 kilohertz
LF, low frequency - 30 to 300 kilohertz
medium frequency, MF - 300 to 3000 kilohertz
high frequency, HF - 3 to 30 megahertz
very high frequency, VHF - 30 to 300 megahertz
UHF, ultrahigh frequency - 300 to 3000 megahertz
SHF, superhigh frequency - 3 to 30 gigahertz
EHF, extremely high frequency - 30 to 300 gigahertz
spectrum - an ordered array of the components of an emission or wave
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
gamma radiation, gamma ray - electromagnetic radiation emitted during radioactive decay and having an extremely short wavelength
infrared spectrum - the spectrum of infrared radiation
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
line - a single frequency (or very narrow band) of radiation in a spectrum
microwave - a short electromagnetic wave (longer than infrared but shorter than radio waves); used for radar and microwave ovens and for transmitting telephone, facsimile, video and data
microwave spectrum - the part of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding to microwaves
radio spectrum, radio-frequency spectrum - the entire spectrum of electromagnetic frequencies used for communications; includes frequencies used for radio and radar and television
ultraviolet spectrum - the spectrum of ultraviolet radiation
color spectrum, visible spectrum - the distribution of colors produced when light is dispersed by a prism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The IR spectra of the PE-BIO films without exposure to C[O.sub.2] laser radiation show an IR absorption band at 1740 [cm.sup.-1] and stretching vibration of carbonyl group (C=O), whereas the IR spectrum of the LDPE films shows this band after being exposed to C[O.sub.2] laser radiation.
S1 in Supplementary Material available online at https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/ 7520640) and Zn(II) complex (Figure 2), the absence of the v(N-H) and v(C=O) peak in the IR spectrum of Zn(II) complex indicates enolization of keto group in L1, which coordinated to the Zn metal center through enolate oxygen.
The advantages of HS-MCR analysis are the ability to examine the complete IR spectrum, resolve overlapping bands, and obtain the reaction rate constants.
His first association with environmental engineering was at British Aerospace, where he worked on missile conditioning and the effects of flying speeds of up to Mach 2 on the IR spectrum of guidance systems before joining English Electric Valves (now e2v) in 1988, where he remains today.
It is essential, that in IR spectrum of AFA the absorption band corresponding to valent fluctuations of group -NH(v = 3300 [cm.sup.-1]) is observed.
The UV at Lmax 236 nm and IR spectrum at 3423 cm corroborated the presence of NH group which indicated
IR spectrum of o-chloro-N,N-diethylbenzylamine indicates Ar-H frequency at 3010cm -1 .
It says its unique window designs feature a durable, clear polymer lens that allows visual, UV and short/mid/longwave IR spectrum inspection and are available in custom shapes and sizes to fit the needs of any application.
As one adds bone glue to the AC 5 sample, these same characteristic C-H vibrational modes of the asphalt composite are still present in the IR spectrum. However, as one increases the amount of bone glue to the sample, then the amount of water in the AC 5 sample also increases and this becomes observable in the IR spectrum.
Quartz is common in each calibration and prediction sample and the Si-O peak around 1048 [cm.sup.-1] covers a significant area in the finger print region in the IR spectrum where illite 980 (m), 794 (w); albite 1094 (w), 981 (w), 742 (w); and analcime 976 (m), 736 (w) give prominent bands (Table 2).