intrauterine device

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Related to IUDs: Mirena, Oral contraceptives

intrauterine device

n. Abbr. IUD
A usually T-shaped device that is inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy, often wrapped in copper or containing a progestin.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intrauterine device

n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) a metal or plastic device, in the shape of a loop, coil, or ring, inserted into the uterus to prevent conception. Abbreviation: IUD
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

intrau′terine device`


n.
any of various contrivances, as a loop or coil, for insertion into the uterus as a contraceptive.
Abbr.: IUD
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intrauterine device - contraceptive device consisting of a piece of bent plastic or metal that is inserted through the vagina into the uterus
loop - an intrauterine device in the shape of a loop
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
dispositif intra-utérinDIUstérilet
gimdos ertmės pesaras
antikoncepčné vnútromaternicové teliesko

intrauterine device

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

IUD

(ˌai juː ˈdiː) noun (abbreviation)
intrauterine device; a plastic or metal contraceptive used by women.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only recently have IUDs, which are reversible and 99 percent effective, come into vogue among public health experts.
Intrauterine devices (IUDs) remain highly effective, reversible family planning methods in developing countries.
Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are contraceptive medical implants used to prevent pregnancies for a long period of time.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released data regarding the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), specifically intrauterine devices (IUDs), in adolescents, and suggested ways to increase their use.
The report found that use of LARC methods — which include intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants — increased nearly fivefold in the last decade among women aged 15-44, from 1.5 percent in 2002 to 7.2 percent in 2011-2013.
women, with IUDs redesigned after safety scares and the development of under-the-skin hormone implants, a government report shows.
teens to avoid unintended pregnancy, and one approach is increased access to long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods--namely, copper and hormonal intrauterine devices (IUDs) and hormonal implants.
IUDs in general have been shown to be effective contraceptives, but they have been too expensive for most women.
The first modern IUDs were developed in the early 1900s, but had many shortcomings.
New York, Feb, 23 ( ANI ): Most women have wrong perception about intrauterine devices (IUDs) safety and effectiveness in preventing unwanted pregnancy, a new survey has revealed.