intrauterine device

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Related to IUDs: Mirena, Oral contraceptives

intrauterine device

n. Abbr. IUD
A usually T-shaped device that is inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy, often wrapped in copper or containing a progestin.

intrauterine device

n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) a metal or plastic device, in the shape of a loop, coil, or ring, inserted into the uterus to prevent conception. Abbreviation: IUD

intrau′terine device`


n.
any of various contrivances, as a loop or coil, for insertion into the uterus as a contraceptive.
Abbr.: IUD
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intrauterine device - contraceptive device consisting of a piece of bent plastic or metal that is inserted through the vagina into the uterus
loop - an intrauterine device in the shape of a loop
Translations
dispositif intra-utérinDIUstérilet
gimdos ertmės pesaras
antikoncepčné vnútromaternicové teliesko

intrauterine device

IUD

(ˌai juː ˈdiː) noun (abbreviation)
intrauterine device; a plastic or metal contraceptive used by women.
References in periodicals archive ?
org/learn/birth-control/iud/how-effective-are-iuds) report by Planned Parenthood Federation of America, a non-profit organization which provides reproductive health care, IUDs are one of the most effective birth control methods.
SAN DIEGO -- Obese women with a body mass index of 40 or greater are more likely to experience expulsion of levonorgestrel IUDs than women with lower BMI, according to findings from a retrospective cohort study.
7) Given that women receiving IUDs are candidates for pregnancy (and perhaps do not know they are pregnant), a simple, risk-free pregnancy test would seem to be an efficient way to avoid a nontrivial harm.
Immediate postpartum IUD insertion deserves greater attention because it can provide immediate contraception, prevents repeat unintended pregnancies, and may serve to reduce the incidence or need for secondary cesarean delivery; however, insertion of conventional T-shape IUDs immediately post placenta delivery is limited by their high expulsion and displacement rates.
IUDs are an ideal form of birth control for many women.
46%, 25/77) whose IUDs were removed constituted the Removed IUD Group, and the remaining 26 patients constituted IUD Left in situ Group.
Only recently have IUDs, which are reversible and 99 percent effective, come into vogue among public health experts.
Mislocated IUDs in omentum and retroperitoneum were converted to laparotomy because of dense adhesions [9].
There are two types of IUDs, namely, copper IUD (containing copper) and hormone-releasing IUDs (containing the progesterone hormone).
Historically, the use of IUDs in nulliparous females was concerning because of the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (which could lead to infertility), pain at insertion, and the cost.