Ibsenism


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Ibsenism

a dramatic invention characteristic of Henrik Ibsen, used in attacking conventional hypocrisies.
See also: Literary Style
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Hu Shi's use of the term "Ibsenism" may have been inspired by Bernard Shaw's The Quintessence of Ibsenism, a long essay published in 1891 by way of addressing the reception of Ibsen in England, especially the stormy controversy between Ibsenites who celebrated him as a hero and champion of women's liberation, and anti-Ibsenites who denounced him as vulgar, nasty, obscene, hateful, loathsome, horrible.
In the reworked edition of The Quintessence of Ibsenism (1913) Shaw spoke of discussion as of the most important innovation by Ibsen, which changed drama profoundly: "The technical novelties of Ibsen and post-Ibsen plays are, then: first, the introduction of the discussion and its development until it so overspreads and interpenetrates the action that it finally assimilates it, making play and discussion practically identical.
61) For example Irvin, 'William Archer: The Prophet of Ibsenism at the Feet of False Gods'.
29 George Bernard Shaw, The Quintessence of Ibsenism, (Michigan: Brentano's, 1913), 50
The relationship between Ibsenism and modern Chinese drama evoked broad scholarly debates about the reincarnation of Ibsen's Nora through theatrical adaptation, performance and recreation.
The Quintessence of Ibsenism, Shaw and Ibsen: Bernard Shaw's The Quintessence of Ibsenism and Related Writings, ed.
This is a term Shaw developed in The Quintessence of Ibsenism to describe Ibsen's habit of relying much of the dramatic weight to conversationally dense scenes.
In this respect, the Fabian historian Ian Britain has suggested that it was through this early contact with Aveling that Charrington's interest in socialism and Ibsenism may have been first aroused.
70) George Bernard Shaw,' Ideals and Idealists', in The Quintessence of Ibsenism (London: Walter Scott, 1891), pp.
Shaw himself provides clues to his views on both socialism and evolution in a passage in The Quintessence of Ibsenism.
It is arguably the one single work that rescued modern Chinese drama from the clutch of "socialist realism, Ibsenism, and Stanislavsky's system.
When mother arrives at this outpost of Ibsenism (Bergman's setting, for a change, is among the Norwegian fjords), it is not too surprising that, after the first affectionate exchanges are over, as Eva listens obediently to her parent's necessarily self-absorbed chatter (she has come, after all, from the world of professional music as practiced in European capitals), the daughter all the while regards the mother with mingled amusement and suspicion.