Ibsenism


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Ibsenism

a dramatic invention characteristic of Henrik Ibsen, used in attacking conventional hypocrisies.
See also: Literary Style
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For this special Ibsen issue of the magazine, Hu Shi not only cotranslated the full text of A Doll's House but also wrote a nearly 10,000-word essay titled "Ibsenism" (Yiboshen zhuyi) (10) that pretty much set the tone of the reception of Ibsen in China for decades to come.
Walchester traces this idea of Gamle Norge through a century of British women's travel writing about Norway, from Mary Wollstonecraft's game-changing Letters Written in Sweden, Norway', and Denmark (1796) through texts from the fin-de-siecle, the era of Fridtjof Nansen's explorations, "Ibsenism" in the British theatre, and, consequently, "Norway mania," as the travel writer Olivia Stone put it in 1882.
In the reworked edition of The Quintessence of Ibsenism (1913) Shaw spoke of discussion as of the most important innovation by Ibsen, which changed drama profoundly: "The technical novelties of Ibsen and post-Ibsen plays are, then: first, the introduction of the discussion and its development until it so overspreads and interpenetrates the action that it finally assimilates it, making play and discussion practically identical.
(61) For example Irvin, 'William Archer: The Prophet of Ibsenism at the Feet of False Gods'.
29 George Bernard Shaw, The Quintessence of Ibsenism, (Michigan: Brentano's, 1913), 50
The relationship between Ibsenism and modern Chinese drama evoked broad scholarly debates about the reincarnation of Ibsen's Nora through theatrical adaptation, performance and recreation.
(21.) The Quintessence of Ibsenism, Shaw and Ibsen: Bernard Shaw's The Quintessence of Ibsenism and Related Writings, ed.
(22.) This is a term Shaw developed in The Quintessence of Ibsenism to describe Ibsen's habit of relying much of the dramatic weight to conversationally dense scenes.
In this respect, the Fabian historian Ian Britain has suggested that it was through this early contact with Aveling that Charrington's interest in socialism and Ibsenism may have been first aroused.
(70) George Bernard Shaw,' Ideals and Idealists', in The Quintessence of Ibsenism (London: Walter Scott, 1891), pp.
Shaw himself provides clues to his views on both socialism and evolution in a passage in The Quintessence of Ibsenism. His remarks on the king, women, and the church are revealing: