ice cap

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Related to Ice caps: Polar ice caps

ice·cap

or ice cap  (īs′kăp′)
n.
An extensive dome-shaped or platelike perennial cover of ice and snow that spreads out from a center and covers a large area, especially of land or a polar region.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ice cap - a mass of ice and snow that permanently covers a large area of land (e.g., the polar regions or a mountain peak)ice cap - a mass of ice and snow that permanently covers a large area of land (e.g., the polar regions or a mountain peak)
ice mass - a large mass of ice
References in classic literature ?
The water which supplies the farms of Mars is collected in immense underground reservoirs at either pole from the melting ice caps, and pumped through long conduits to the various populated centers.
We were above the south polar ice cap. Only at the poles of Mars is there ice or snow upon the planet.
Elevation changes of ice caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.
But for intrepid explorer Pen Hadow a trip up to the Arctic isn't just to test his own limits; it's to discover just how much, and how quickly, the ice caps are melting.
"We feel that ignoring the contributions of small glaciers and ice caps is dangerous because it affects the accuracy of predictions of sea level rise," says Pfeffer.--S.P.
The study found global warming could cause a cool-off effect from the North Atlantic as ice caps melt.
Global warming has melted the polar ice caps, which has caused a rise in sea levels.
IT'Sbeen blamed for the hole in the ozone layer,higher pollution and melting ice caps - now global warming may also have a hand in the demise of the great British cuppa,according to a report out today.
astronomer Percival Lowell even mapped out the canals, boldly claiming they were irrigation systems used to transport water from the planet's polar ice caps to Martian civilizations.
They show the ice caps of the North and South poles on Mars.
Ice caps in alpine regions throughout the tropics and subtropics are melting at a phenomenal rate.
The bad news, if the findings of (http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14730) a study published Friday in the journal Nature Communications are to be believed, is that the glaciers and ice caps that dot the edges of the Greenland's coast are unlikely to recover from the melting they are currently experiencing.