ego ideal

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ego ideal

n.
In psychoanalysis, the part of one's ego that contains an idealized self based on those people, especially parents and peers, one admires and wishes to emulate.

ego ideal

n
(Psychoanalysis) psychoanal an internal ideal of personal perfection that represents what one wants to be rather than what one ought to be and is derived from one's early relationship with one's parents. See also superego

e′go ide`al


n.
Psychoanal. an ideal of personal excellence based on positive identification with parent figures.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ego ideal - (psychoanalysis) the part of the ego that contains an ideal of personal excellence toward which a person strives
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
ideal - the idea of something that is perfect; something that one hopes to attain
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several amusing scenes in which Polly visually apprehends her ideal ego via screens, billboards, posters and even childhood photographs.
Lacan specifies that there are two fantasies or versions of an ideal self that can exist only in the imaginary: the ideal ego and the ego ideal.
But, pictured as a cohesive unit, that image is projected as an ideal ego.
Laying out the dynamic relationship among the ideal ego, ego ideal, and objet a, Penney convincingly argues for a shift from symptomatic to transferential interpretation in cultural studies.
Gabriel's image of his ideal ego emanates from what the phallic monument to Wellington represents.
In this role as the Imaginary ideal ego, Cosey appears in fact as a decent citizen and role model.
As a result, Prufrock's fictional unity which establishes the specular ideal ego collapses, and he remembers earliest images of body disintegration and specular fragmentary images.
The imaginary subject of the mirror stage is likewise framed in the symbolic by means of the unary trait, the ego ideal that identifies the form in the mirror, the ideal ego, as a subject for the Other; the proper name as the trace or metonym of the subject is 'a model for the unary trait' that constitutes 'a subject-as-meaning, despite the fact the name itself is meaningless' (55).