identity theory


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identity theory

n
(Philosophy) philosophy a form of materialism which holds mental states to be identical with certain states of the brain and so to have no separate existence, but regards this identity as contingent so that mentalistic and physicalistic language are not held to be synonymous. See also anomalous monism, materialism2
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most widely applied approaches to studying identity in social psychology is guided by the framework of social identity theory, which asserts that one's self-concept is comprised of both individual and social identities (Tajfel & Turner, 1979, 1986).
Derived from social identity theory, ethno-linguistic identity theory explains why members of a bilingual group continue to use a non-mainstream language rather than use the mainstream language exclusively (Giles, Bourhis & Taylor, 1977; Giles & Johnson, 1987).
Indeed, many literary critics now broaden the scope of narrative identity theory to include not only the stories that an individual tells herself (and often to others), but also particular stories that society privileges.
Design/methodology/approach: This correlational study used the Social Identity Theory as its underpinning theory.
Editors Pierce, Russell, Maldonado, and Campbell present readers with a collection of scholarly articles examining the application of contemporary identity theory to the field of archaeological research.
According to social identity theory, people categorize themselves according to various social stratifications (Tajfel and Turner: 1985).
Cvencek, Greenwald, and Meltzoff (2012) renamed this the balanced identity theory (BIT), according to which implicit attitudes can be formed or changed by manipulating the identification between a target concept and the self, as is shown in the implicit partisanship effect.
derives an emphasis on identity theory and notions of relationality as the basis for a more integrated and flexible understanding of religious sameness and difference.
This paper will present a theoretical framework, based on identity theory that will assist educators in understanding university attrition and engagement at the level of the individual.
Building on social identity theory, entrepreneurial and strategy research, this project adopt mainly a demand-oriented approach.
By developing and utilizing the concept of Representational Identity Theory, Brown illuminates the variations of experiences that exist among this group.