ideogram

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Related to Ideographic language: Ideographic Writing, Logographic script

id·e·o·gram

 (ĭd′ē-ə-grăm′, ī′dē-)
n.
1. A character or symbol representing an idea or a thing without expressing the pronunciation of a particular word or words for it, as in the traffic sign commonly used for "no parking" or "parking prohibited." Also called ideograph.
2. See logogram.
3. A graphic symbol, such as &, $, or @.

id′e·o·gram·mat′ic (-grə-măt′ĭk) adj.
id′e·o·gram·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

ideogram

(ˈɪdɪəʊˌɡræm) or

ideograph

n
1. (Linguistics) a sign or symbol, used in such writing systems as those of China or Japan, that directly represents a concept, idea, or thing rather than a word or set of words for it
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) any graphic sign or symbol, such as %, @, &, etc

id•e•o•gram

(ˈɪd i əˌgræm, ˈaɪ di-)

n.
1. a written symbol that represents an idea or object directly rather than a particular word or speech sound.
[1830–40]

ideogram

A pictorial system used in a writing system to represent an entity or an idea. Ideograms are also called ideographs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ideogram - a graphic character that indicates the meaning of a thing without indicating the sounds used to say it; "Chinese characters are ideograms"
grapheme, graphic symbol, character - a written symbol that is used to represent speech; "the Greek alphabet has 24 characters"
logogram, logograph - a single written symbol that represents an entire word or phrase without indicating its pronunciation; "7 is a logogram that is pronounced `seven' in English and `nanatsu' in Japanese"
radical - a character conveying the lexical meaning of a logogram
Translations
指事表意文字

ideogram

[ˈɪdɪəgræm] Nideograma m

ideogram

[ˈɪdiəgræm] n

ideogram

, ideograph
nIdeogramm nt

ideogram

[ˈɪdɪəʊˌgræm] ideograph [ˌɪdɪˈɒgrəf] nideogramma m
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, there is a strong interrelationship between the symbol system of language and the symbol system of drawing, and in an ideographic language such as Japanese or Chinese this interrelationship is more natural than in a language such as English (Goodnow, 1977).
One chapter dating from the 1970's argues for the development of a universal ideographic language to overcome the language barrier for non-English speakers throughout the world.
The encounter between an alphabetized society and an ideographic language at different levels of power and control necessarily remade the latter on the template of the former.
Chinese language, an ideographic language with syntactic and semantic systems, provides a vivid picture of China as a sexist society.