idiosyncrasy

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id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

 (ĭd′ē-ō-sĭng′krə-sē)
n. pl. id·i·o·syn·cra·sies
1. A structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group.
2. A physiological or temperamental peculiarity.
3. An unusual individual reaction to food or a drug.

[Greek idiosunkrāsiā : idio-, idio- + sunkrāsis, mixture, temperament (sun-, syn- + krāsis, a mixing; see kerə- in Indo-European roots).]

id′i·o·syn·crat′ic (-sĭn-krăt′ĭk) adj.
id′i·o·syn·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

idiosyncrasy

(ˌɪdɪəʊˈsɪŋkrəsɪ)
n, pl -sies
1. a tendency, type of behaviour, mannerism, etc, of a specific person; quirk
2. the composite physical or psychological make-up of a specific person
3. (Pathology) an abnormal reaction of an individual to specific foods, drugs, or other agents
[C17: from Greek idiosunkrasia, from idio- + sunkrasis mixture, temperament, from sun- syn- + kerannunai to mingle]

id•i•o•syn•cra•sy

(ˌɪd i əˈsɪŋ krə si, -ˈsɪn-)

n., pl. -sies.
1. a characteristic, habit, mannerism, etc., that is peculiar to or distinctive of an individual.
2. the physical or mental constitution peculiar to an individual.
3. a peculiarity of the physical or mental constitution, esp. a sensitivity to drugs, food, etc.
[1595–1605; < Greek idiosynkrāsía=idio- idio- + syn- syn- + krâsis a blending + -ia -y3]
id`i•o•syn•crat′ic (-oʊ sɪnˈkræt ɪk, -sɪŋ-) adj.
id`i•o•syn•crat′i•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See eccentricity.

idiosyncrasy

a mannerism, action, or form of behavior peculiar to one person or group. — idiosyncratic, idiosyncratical, adj.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiosyncrasy - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individualidiosyncrasy - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individual

idiosyncrasy

noun peculiarity, habit, characteristic, quirk, eccentricity, oddity, mannerism, affectation, trick, singularity, personal trait One of his idiosyncrasies was to wear orange gloves.

idiosyncrasy

noun
Translations
idiosinkrazija
idiossincrasia

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdɪəˈsɪŋkrəsɪ] Nidiosincrasia f
Victorian idiosyncrasyla idiosincrasia victoriana
it's one of her idiosyncrasieses una de sus peculiaridades

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdiəʊˈsɪŋkrəsi] nsingularité f

idiosyncrasy

nEigenheit f, → Eigenart f, → Besonderheit f; (Ling, Med) → Idiosynkrasie f

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdɪəˈsɪŋkrəsɪ] n (peculiarity, foible) → (piccola) mania; (characteristic) → particolarità f inv

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

n. idiosincrasia.
1. características individuales;
2. reacción peculiar de cada persona a una acción, idea, medicamento, tratamiento o alimento.
References in periodicals archive ?
Will added: "All of this doesn't happen by default, you've got to have the experience and know aboulocal holidays and idiosyncracies because you can't afford to arrive on a holiday and have the gear sit there for 24 hours because then it's not going on stage or to a film set.
The massive Black Nazarene procession this past week was the first big one - a distinctive mixture of faith, culture, aspirations, and idiosyncracies.
A sensible mother adjusts to her children's idiosyncracies.
Massively, one would imagine, and not just in terms of getting to know the track and its idiosyncracies.
It was authenticated by a variety of methods, including painstaking, word-by-word checks to make sure the well-documented quirks and idiosyncracies of the genuine 1623 First Folio were present.
I've been there a long time," he says, "and although I'm ambitious, I know the place and all its problems and idiosyncracies so it almost seems wrong for me to leave.
But because of the idiosyncracies of hospitals, Diplomat's approach with them is very flexible and integrated, based on each hospital's operating procedures and strategic needs.
By this I mean that the viewer is engaged only at the general (often academic) level, once the idiosyncracies of the individual experience have been distilled into a graspable form.
Maradona the legend and Balotelli were cited as examples of a flawed genius, but Prof Andrew Harrison insisted that personalties like them need to be appreciated for their talent and contribution in changing their sport rather than be shunned for their idiosyncracies.
No one made any subject much interesting to learn, it was only the personal idiosyncracies of various teachers that impressed us and stayed with us for longer than what they might have taught us.
Gavrilov is an amazing performer, bristling with idiosyncracies of body-language.