Idiotcy

Id´i`ot`cy


n.1.Idiocy.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in classic literature ?
'But I'll not believe this idiotcy! It is impossible that you can covet the admiration of Heathcliff - that you consider him an agreeable person!
Beadle goes into various shops and parlours, examining the inhabitants, always shutting the door first, and by exclusion, delay, and general idiotcy exasperating the public.
Written by Thomas Egerton Wilks and produced in 1839, this iteration of the domestic melodrama begins shortly after the tragic ruin of Michael Erie, a tradesman of Lichfield whose would-be wife, Ellen, has been seduced by an upper-class rogue and whose broken heart has thrown Michael "into a deep melancholy, which eventually terminated in idiotcy [sic]." (25) Michael, now known to the town as "the Maniac Lover," wanders the streets of Lichfield by day and sleeps in the neighboring grove by night.
(19) For example, a 1315 writ of inquisition was made on William de Lillebon, 'a lunatic, whose lands and tenements by reason of his idiotcy [sic] are in our hands', and having died, 'as we are told, we command you diligently to enquire what lands and tenements came to our hands by reason of his idiotcy, etc.' (20) The inquisitional testimony stated that William was a lunatic.