Semmelweis

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Sem·mel·weis

 (zĕm′əl-vīs′), Ignaz Philipp Originally Ignác Fülöp Semmelweis. 1818-1865.
Hungarian physician who determined that puerperal fever in a maternity clinic in Vienna was spread by doctors and students who examined pregnant women directly after performing autopsies. The mortality rate dropped after he required staff members to disinfect their hands before examinations.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Semmelweis

(ˈsɛməlˌvaɪs)
n
(Biography) Ignaz Philipp. 1818–65, Hungarian obstetrician, who discovered the cause of puerperal infection and pioneered the use of antiseptics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I read in horrified fascination about Ignaz Semmelweis, the tragic Hungarian obstetrician, who in the mid-1800s already held the key to ridding Europe of childbed fever -- for obstetricians to wash their hands -- but no one in the entrenched medical establishment believed him.
Ignaz Semmelweis developed a theory regarding hand washing.
Johnson realized the difference a good doctor could make when he read "The Cry and the Covenant," a fictionalized account of 19th century Austrian-Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis, who is credited with discovering that many women died during childbirth because doctors didn't wash their hands.
In 1847, Hungarian obstetrician Ignaz Semmelweis demonstrated that he could greatly reduce maternal deaths in his clinic simply by having doctors sterilize their hands.
Ignaz Semmelweis, a 19th century obstetrician, championed handwashing at a time when most physicians thought it unimportant (White, 2016).
The quality-improvement work of Ignaz Semmelweis should be required reading for all physicians.
From there, I will go on to recommend to those graduating from colleges everywhere in the world this spring that their hero be Ignaz Semmelweis.
Ignaz Semmelweis, a Hungarian physician, discovers that hand-washing prevents a common but fatal bacterial infection contracted by women during childbirth.
Will Sawyer and his right hand Henry the Hand Champion Handwasher went down to Charleston, South Carolina to announce the greatest public health innovation since Ignaz Semmelweis and handwashing in the 1860's.
For example, when the mid-19th century Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis showed that proper hand disinfection correlated with a dramatic decrease in the occurrence of puerperal fever, his suggestion was dismissed because he had no proof of his causal explanation.
Ignaz Semmelweis was a Hungarian obstetrician practicing in the mid-1800's, years before Louis Pasteur came up with his germ theory and Joseph Lister popularized hand washing.