ignoble

(redirected from Ignobel)
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ig·no·ble

 (ĭg-nō′bəl)
adj.
1. Not noble in quality, character, or purpose; base or dishonorable. See Synonyms at base2.
2. Not of high social status; common.

[Middle English, of low birth, from Old French, from Latin ignōbilis : i-, in-, not; see in-1 + nōbilis, gnōbilis, noble; see noble.]

ig′no·bil′i·ty (-bĭl′ĭ-tē), ig·no′ble·ness n.
ig·no′bly adv.

ignoble

(ɪɡˈnəʊbəl)
adj
1. dishonourable; base; despicable
2. of low birth or origins; humble; common
3. of low quality; inferior
4. (Falconry) falconry
a. designating short-winged hawks that capture their quarry by swiftness and adroitness of flight. Compare noble7
b. designating quarry which is inferior or unworthy of pursuit by a particular species of hawk or falcon
[C16: from Latin ignōbilis, from in-1 + Old Latin gnōbilis noble]
ˌignoˈbility, igˈnobleness n
igˈnobly adv

ig•no•ble

(ɪgˈnoʊ bəl)

adj.
1. of low character; mean; base: ignoble purposes.
2. of humble descent or rank.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin ignōbilis unknown, inglorious =in- in-3 + Old Latin gnōbilis (Latin nōbilis) noble]
ig`no•bil′i•ty, ig•no′ble•ness, n.
ig•no′bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ignoble - completely lacking nobility in character or quality or purpose; "something cowardly and ignoble in his attitude"; "I think it a less evil that some criminals should escape than that the government should play an ignoble part"- Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
cowardly, fearful - lacking courage; ignobly timid and faint-hearted; "cowardly dogs, ye will not aid me then"- P.B.Shelley
contemptible - deserving of contempt or scorn
dishonorable, dishonourable - lacking honor or integrity; deserving dishonor; "dishonorable in thought and deed"
noble - having or showing or indicative of high or elevated character; "a noble spirit"; "noble deeds"
2.ignoble - not of the nobilityignoble - not of the nobility; "of ignoble (or ungentle) birth"; "untitled civilians"
lowborn - of humble birth or origins; "a topsy-turvy society of lowborn rich and blue-blooded poor"

ignoble

adjective
2. lowly, mean, low, base, common, peasant, vulgar, plebeian, humble, lowborn (rare), baseborn (archaic) They wanted to spare him the shame of an ignoble birth.

ignoble

adjective
1. Having or proceeding from low moral standards:
2. Lacking high station or birth:
Archaic: base.
Translations
دَنيء، خَسيس
nečestný
lavuværdigvanærende
gemeinignobel
auvirîilegur, fyrirlitlegur; ógeîslegur
niekingumas
nekrietnszemisks
alçakşerefsiz

ignoble

[ɪgˈnəʊbl] ADJ (frm) → innoble, vil

ignoble

[ɪgˈnəʊbəl] adjignoble, indigne

ignoble

[ɪgˈnəʊbl] adjignobile

ignoble

(igˈnoubl) adjective
shameful. an ignoble action.
igˈnobleness noun
igˈnobly adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
The IgNobel for Physics went to four researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, GA.
Ao menos (como o Comite do IgNobel gostaria), e um ponto a se pensar.
He won the IgNobel Award in 2000 for levitating a live frog with magnets--and then [won the Nobel] for isolating graphene 10 years later.
First, and for many the most exciting, was a report from the annual IgNobel Prize Awards ceremony in America.
Fabio Carpi ha fatto attraversare l'Europa ai due protagonisti di Nobel IGnobel, Daniele Luchetti ha girato in Grecia Dillo con parole mie, e Francesca Comencini, ha voluto ambientare in parte negli Stati Uniti la torbida vicenda di abusi familiari di La bestia nel cuore.
In 1997 he levitated a frog using a magnetic field, winning himself a tongue-in-cheek "IgNobel Award" from the Annals of Improbable Research in 2000.
EVERY year at this time, I bring you news of the Ignobel Awards - a set of prizes for the most useless scientific and social discoveries of the year.
THE military developers of a chemical "gay bomb" that made headlines earlier this year were among the (not-so) proud recipients of 2007 IgNobel prizes.
Well, the developer of that tone has won 2006 IgNobel prizes--an award highlighting real-but-amusing scientific advances.
Sloan Research Fellowship (2005) and--somewhat less proudly, but jointly with Joel Slemrod--of the 2001 IgNobel Prize in Economics.