illiquid asset

(redirected from Illiquid Investment)
Also found in: Financial.
Related to Illiquid Investment: Illiquid Asset, Liquid Markets

illiquid asset

An asset that cannot easily be converted into cash and, therefore, has low liquidity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The firm manages private investment funds across the credit, special situations and illiquid investment markets of North America and Europe using an active long and short basis, with particular focus on defaulted and leveraged issuers.
That has changed in favour of more illiquid investment ideas, typically private equity, real estate, in terms of farmland or commercial real estate.
Jim has worked with multiple liquid and illiquid investment strategies and structures and brings added strength and breadth to our finance and administration team.
The first thing to be aware of is that art is an extremely illiquid investment.
The right piece of art can reap huge rewards but it is a highly illiquid investment, as the value of art fluctuates depending on economic conditions, fashion and timing.
Private equity is also often grouped into a broader category called private capital, generally used to describe capital supporting any long-term (5-10 year holding period), illiquid investment strategy.
It is clear from the speed with which we achieved majority control, that many Adelaide Energy shareholders have taken the opportunity to receive cash for their investment ahead of significant funding requirements, and what will become an increasingly illiquid investment.
A single-family home is also a highly illiquid investment, as selling a home typically requires significant time and effort.
In the circumstances, the large and illiquid investment in houses, with their recurring maintenance costs, mean a very large, often unbearable, opportunity cost.
The focus has been appropriately on the cash-flow challenges that come from a combination of large illiquid investment portfolios and large systemic shocks that cause adverse shifts in the cash flow models.
Of seminars probed by examiners, 23% involved possibly unsuitable recommendations, such as an illiquid investment suggested to an investor who would soon need the cash.