speech act

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speech act

n.
An act that is performed by making an utterance, as the issuing of a warning, the making of a promise, or the giving of a greeting.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

speech act

n
1. (Logic) an utterance that constitutes some act in addition to the mere act of uttering
2. (Philosophy) an act or type of act capable of being so performed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.speech act - the use of language to perform some act
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
congratulation, felicitation - the act of acknowledging that someone has an occasion for celebration
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
proposal, proposition - the act of making a proposal; "they listened to her proposal"
bid, bidding, command, dictation - an authoritative direction or instruction to do something
agreement - the verbal act of agreeing
citation - (law) the act of citing (as of spoken words or written passages or legal precedents etc.)
disagreement - the speech act of disagreeing or arguing or disputing
offer, offering - the verbal act of offering; "a generous offer of assistance"
asking, request - the verbal act of requesting
reply, response - the speech act of continuing a conversational exchange; "he growled his reply"
description - the act of describing something
affirmation, assertion, statement - the act of affirming or asserting or stating something
denial - the act of refusing to comply (as with a request); "it resulted in a complete denial of his privileges"
rejection - the speech act of rejecting
objection - the speech act of objecting
making known, informing - a speech act that conveys information
disclosure, revealing, revelation - the speech act of making something evident
promise - a verbal commitment by one person to another agreeing to do (or not to do) something in the future
boast, boasting, jactitation, self-praise - speaking of yourself in superlatives
naming - the verbal act of naming; "the part he failed was the naming of state capitals"
challenge - a call to engage in a contest or fight
explanation - the act of explaining; making something plain or intelligible; "I heard his explanation of the accident"
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
speech, address - the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience; "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"
resignation - the act of giving up (a claim or office or possession etc.)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Sprechakt
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) If we take another element in Austin's definition and emphasize the context, we see that those "appropriate circumstances" are highly significant for the illocutionary act. When applied to literary works, we have to consider that language creates the fictional world in which the reader is invited as audience.
The locutionary act can be defined as "the act of 'saying something'" (94), (the production of speech and its meaning), the illocutionary act as the "performance of an act in saying something" (99), (the utterance in context).
Khatchadourian criticizes Alston's contention that meaning is an illocutionary act potential, suggesting that the theory presupposes the meaning of the propositional content to which illocutionary force applies.
(c) Illocutionary act is performed by a business service (activity) such as sell car.
If I said, "Veronica urged me not to go into the bar," I would be describing the illocutionary act, the type of speech act that was performed taking context into account.
He divides the utterances produced by a speaker into three groups as locutionary act, illocutionary act and perlocutionary act and writes that the interpretation of a locutionary act is an issue of meaning whereas the interpretation of an illocutionary act is an issue of force.
A single query, such as "Where can I find a biography of Mark Twain?" exhibits this kind of character and is called an illocutionary act. A reply such as "You can search the library's online catalog by 'Mark Twain' as a subject" is also an illocutionary act.
All of these encode information about the type of message (illocutionary act) the speaker intends to convey by way of the utterance.
Searle and Vanderveken (1985) use it to make an important distinction between two components of speech acts--the illocutionary act and the propositional act:
As Searle (1975) explained, "A sentence that contains the illocutionary force indicators for one kind of illocutionary act can be uttered to perform, in addition, another type of illocutionary act" (p.