Imbricative

Im´bri`ca`tive


a.1.(Bot.) Imbricate.
References in periodicals archive ?
This "mutually imbricative" relationship between sexual and racial normativity (90) is also the subject of Betina Entzminger's "Passing as Miscegenation: Whiteness and Homoeroticism in Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!" But where in Lopez's essay whiteness is itself queered by fault lines in compulsory heterosexuality, Entzminger concentrates on how that threat is ultimately averted in Absalom, Absalom!
"imbricative marketing") which have failed to stand the test of time as a result, presumably, of their ultimate inappropriateness to the crucial concerns of the day.
By blurring the boundaries and emphasizing the interconnections of race, gender, and sexuality, Faulkner reveals that hierarchical categories are arbitrary, they serve to facilitate denial, and they are mutually imbricative, relying on each other to function.