sumatriptan

(redirected from Imigran)
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su·ma·trip·tan

 (so͞o′mə-trĭp′tn)
n.
A triptan drug, C14H21N3O2S, used also in the form of its succinate to treat migraine headache and cluster headache.

[suma-, origin unknown + -triptan, triptan suffix; see triptan.]
Translations

sumatriptan

n sumatriptán m
References in periodicals archive ?
32) Yurod Saleh, "Permasalahan dan Solusi Penempatan dan Pengawasan Imigran Illegal," PowerPoint presentation, focus group discussion, Penempatan dan Pengawasan Imigran Illegal, Jakarta, 26 November 2015.
In 1990, the first reusable auto-injector, known as Imigran was launched for the treatment of migraine.
PAIN RELIEF: Stop a migraine with over-the-counter pain-relief drugs, or talk to your doctor about trying a class of prescription drugs called triptans, which can also be bought direct from your chemist as Imigran Recovery.
05 Tahun 2010 tentang Penanganan Imigran Ilegal [Immigration Director General Regulation No.
TRY: If you know you're prone to migraines, it might be worth taking Imigran Recovery (PSfrom pharmacies) in your first-aid kit, as it's the only counter treatment that contains the ingredient sumatriptan, which research found can prevent a full-blown attack for many people if it's taken early enough.
Separate research, conducted by migraine treatment Imigran Recovery, implies that stress is the most common trigger for migraines.
She now has a repeat Imigran prescription to cope with the headaches.
Investigators visited Lloyds, Boots, Alliance/Moss, independent and supermarket pharmacies as well as national and regional chains to ask about emergency contraception, migraine drug Imigran Recovery and traveller's diarrhoea.
Glaxosmithkline was in the news yesterday after a favourable court ruling in Greece over the long-running case involving the supply of three of the company's medicines, Lamictal, Imigran and Servent.
The Liverpool Echo has teamed up with Imigran Recovery*, the new over the- counter (OTC) migraine treatment, to offer one lucky reader two tickets to a star-studded UK movie premiere.
Glaxo tried to stop them reselling drugs by cutting off all supplies of three patent medicines - Imigran, Lamictal and Servent - in November 2000.