impeachment

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im·peach

 (ĭm-pēch′)
tr.v. im·peached, im·peach·ing, im·peach·es
1.
a. To make an accusation against: impeach someone of a crime.
b. To bring formal charges against (a public official) for wrongdoing while in office.
2. To raise doubts about; discredit or disparage: impeach a witness's credibility; impeach someone's character.

[Middle English empechen, to impede, accuse, from Anglo-Norman empecher, from Late Latin impedicāre, to entangle : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin pedica, fetter; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

im·peach′a·ble adj.
im·peach′a·bil′i·ty n.
im·peach′er n.
im·peach′ment n.
Usage Note: When an irate citizen demands that a disfavored public official be impeached, the citizen clearly intends for the official to be removed from office. This popular use of impeach as a synonym of "throw out" (even if by due process) does not accord with the legal meaning of the word. When a public official is impeached, that is, formally accused of wrongdoing, this is only the start of what can be a lengthy process that may or may not lead to the official's removal from office. In strict usage, an official is impeached (accused), tried, and then convicted or acquitted. The vaguer use of impeach reflects disgruntled citizens' indifference to whether the official is forced from office by legal means or chooses to resign to avoid further disgrace.

impeachment

(ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt)
n
1. (Parliamentary Procedure) rare (in England) committal by the House of Commons, esp of a minister of the Crown, for trial by the House of Lords. The last instance occurred in 1805
2. (Law) (in the US) a proceeding brought against a federal government official
3. (Law) an accusation or charge
4. obsolete discredit; reproach

im•peach•ment

(ɪmˈpitʃ mənt)

n.
1. the act of impeaching; condition of being impeached.
2. (in the U.S. Congress or a state legislature) the presentation of charges against a public official by the lower house, with trial to be before the upper house.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French]

impeachment

The charging of a public official before a quasipolitical body with having committed an offense while in office.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impeachment - a formal document charging a public official with misconduct in officeimpeachment - a formal document charging a public official with misconduct in office
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right

impeachment

noun accusation, prosecution, indictment, arraignment Unconstitutional actions would be grounds for impeachment.
Translations
مُحاكَمَة أو إتهام رئيس الجمهوريَّه
obvinění ze zločinu
rigsretssag
vád alá helyezés
ákæra, lögsókn
obvinenie zo zločinu

impeachment

[ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt]
A. N (= accusation) → acusación f de prevaricación; (= trial) → proceso m por prevaricación; [of president] → proceso m de destitución
B. CPD impeachment hearing Njuicio m por destitución
impeachment proceedings NPLproceso m de destitución

impeachment

[ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt] n [president] → procédure f de l'impeachment, mise f en cause de la responsabilité pénale

impeachment

n
(Jur: = accusation) → Anklage f (wegen eines Amtsvergehens); (US: of president) → Amtsenthebungsverfahren nt, → Impeachment nt
(= questioning) (of sb’s character, motives)Infragestellung f, → Anzweiflung f; (of testimony also)Anfechtung f

impeachment

[ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt] n (Law) → impeachment m inv

impeach

(imˈpiːtʃ) verb
to accuse of a crime, especially to accuse a person who works for the government of a crime against the State.
imˈpeachment noun
References in classic literature ?
THE remaining powers which the plan of the convention allots to the Senate, in a distinct capacity, are comprised in their participation with the executive in the appointment to offices, and in their judicial character as a court for the trial of impeachments.
A well-constituted court for the trial of impeachments is an object not more to be desired than difficult to be obtained in a government wholly elective.
The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments.
The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.
No part of the arrangement, according to some, is more inadmissible than the trial of impeachments by the Senate, which is alternately a member both of the legislative and executive departments, when this power so evidently belonged to the judiciary department.
Then come impeachments and judgments and trials of one another.
This lord, in conjunction with Flimnap the high-treasurer, whose enmity against you is notorious on account of his lady, Limtoc the general, Lalcon the chamberlain, and Balmuff the grand justiciary, have prepared articles of impeachment against you, for treason and other capital crimes.
Burke and other men saw the corruption and misery without realizing the excuses for it and on the return of Hastings to England in 1786 they secured his impeachment.
A blush on the countenance of Monsieur the Marquis was no impeachment of his high breeding; it was not from within; it was occasioned by an external circumstance beyond his control--the setting sun.
He is a gentleman of strict conscience, disdainful of all littleness and meanness and ready on the shortest notice to die any death you may please to mention rather than give occasion for the least impeachment of his integrity.
It was pointed out to the Prince, in impeachment of this decree, that the victory had been in fact won by the Disinherited Knight, who, in the course of the day, had overcome six champions with his own hand, and who had finally unhorsed and struck down the leader of the opposite party.
One would think you expected to find in them the answer to the riddle of the universe," she said; and I denied the impeachment only by replying that if I had to choose between that precious solution and a bundle of Jeffrey Aspern's letters I knew indeed which would appear to me the greater boon.