laying on of hands

(redirected from Imposition of Hands)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

laying on of hands

n
(Alternative Belief Systems) (in Christian ordination, confirmation, faith healing, etc) the act of laying hands on a person's head to confer spiritual blessing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lay′ing on′ of hands′


n.
1. a rite in which a cleric's hands touch the person to be ordained, healed, etc.
2. the placing of the hands, as of a faith healer, upon a person to be cured.
[1490–1500]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

laying on of hands

A technique used in spiritual healing in which the healing power of a god or spirit is channelled through the hands of the healer to the patient.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laying on of hands - the application of a faith healer's hands to the patient's body
faith cure, faith healing - care provided through prayer and faith in God
2.laying on of hands - laying hands on a person's head to invoke spiritual blessing in Christian ordination
ordinance, ordination - the act of ordaining; the act of conferring (or receiving) holy orders; "the rabbi's family was present for his ordination"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The imposition of hands signifies empowerment, as when leaders in the Christian community are appointed and empowered when the Apostles lay their hands on them.
The summary states that the book's authors cite a 1972 work by another French author--The Ministry of Women in the Early Church by Roger Gryson--to indicate that in the time of the early church, women deacons "indisputably make part of the clergy They receive an ordination conferred by the imposition of hands and a prayer of the bishop."
(Tertullian dealt solely with heretical baptism; Cyprian with schismatics.) Many Africans disagreed, insisting only on imposition of hands for such converts to receive the Holy Spirit" (176).