impossibilism


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impossibilism

(ɪmˈpɒsɪbəlɪzəm)
n
1. (Sociology) sociol a socialist interpretation suggesting that reforms are generally impossible and that revolutionary action is the only way to bring about socialism
2. (Art Terms) art a small art movement focusing on objects, such as three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional spaces that disobey the laws of logic

impossibilism

a defeatist attitude; the belief that all things are impossible.
See also: Attitudes
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Other highlights of the book include the discussion and rebuttal of some incompatibilist arguments, including the consequence argument and (Pereboom's version of) the manipulation argument, as well as some arguments for impossibilism (the thesis that free will and responsibility are impossible), including fatalist arguments.
There is too much of the perfectionism and impossibilism of an earlier left to some of the newer movements that have come along, too much of the utopian faith in moving mountains, too little adherence to the values of pluralism, tolerance and mutual respect.
Or to put the point cruelly, impossibilism is itself impossible.
I have not found any master fallacy behind impossibilism.
But given impossibilism, believing someone believes impossibilities should be a special case of believing an impossibility.
Another stratagem is to abandon impossibilism about belief in favor of another propositional attitude that resembles belief (Marcus 1990).
Although this would not secure an actual opponent to impossibilism, the argument would open the possibility that an actual person could seem opposed.
Ruth Marcus (1983) bases her impossibilism on the principle that a belief attribution is defeated when it is discovered that no state of affairs could make the belief true.
This coincided with the formulation of various theoretical and practical reactions to postmodernity's impossibilism within critical criminology, one of which was the social-democratic pragmatism of left realism.
In this way, realist critical criminology offered an alternate approach to the crude forms of self-proclaimed Marxist criminologies, in which economic reductionism, brute and romanticized class analysis,(13) structuralist determinism, and rigid state theory debauched into a de facto impossibilism.
Now is not the time for critical criminologies to indulge in nihilism, shameless impossibilism, or misplaced pragmatics.
Critical criminology must avoid being swept along by postmodernist impossibilism.