improvisatore


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

improvisatore

(ɪmˌprɒviːsɑːˈtɔːreɪ) or

improvvisatore

n, pl -tori (-ˈtɔːrɪ)
a person who composes or performs poetic verse without prior preparation or forethought
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1834 he went to Rome by means from his benefactors, and the impressions from this journey resulted in the novel The Improvisatore (Improvisatoren 1835).
Besides, Joan had learned that Fuller had claimed in 1849 that Hans Christian Anderson had described her house in "The Improvisatore," which had been published with an illustration of this building.
In 1819 he published his first poem in a newspaper and he was probably already working on his first published volume, The Improvisatore, a macabre narrative poem that foreshadowed Beddoes's taste for death, violence and degradation, the key elements in the "memento mori spectacle" (Neil 1998: 113) depicted in his poetry: "But on their best-loved flowers, that perished brood,/Cast their last kiss of perfume and of blood,/Tinge with their dying breath some opening bloom,/And breathe one sigh, then hurry to their tomb." (Beddoes 1890a: 212)
THERE COULD HARDLY BE A MORE THOROUGHLY FORGOTTEN TEXT THAN Andrew of Padua, the Improvisatore, a novel that appeared in London in 1820.
In the unfinished work of 1835, the Russian poet-aristocrat Charsky becomes acquainted with and agrees to take under his social wing a ragged, but astonishingly gifted Italian improvisatore who appeals to Charsky for promotional help.
(35) 'The improvisatrice's [Corinne's] poetry becomes less important than what she symbolizes--whether that is an implicitly feminized Italy, overflowing with excessive fertility in literature as in agriculture, or the doomed career of the artist as woman, reliving Sappho's tragic fate' (Caroline Gonda, 'The Rise and Fall of the Improvisatore, 1753-1845', Romanticism, 6 (2000), 195-210 (p.
While still at school he began writing the poems which he published in his freshman year at Oxford, The Improvisatore (1821).
His breakthrough was the novel The Improvisatore , published in 1835, and that year he began writing his world famous fairytales.
The poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote in The Improvisatore: "The happiness of life ...
The use of "improvisatori" (from Italian improvisatore, an entertainer who improvises verse) (4) for courtly entertainment during their isolation suggests that the setting of this tale is Italy or a nearby European country.
An undergraduate student at his father's old Oxford college, Pembroke, he was already a published (if not yet well-known) poet; his outrageously lurid Gothic volume, The Improvisatore, had appeared in March.