Nagy

(redirected from Imre Nagy)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Nagy

(Hungarian nɔdj)
n
(Biography) Imre (ˈimrɛ). 1896–1958, Hungarian statesman; prime minister (1953–55; 1956). He was removed from office and later executed when Soviet forces suppressed the revolution of 1956; reburied with honours in 1989
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, in Budapest, Hungary, 250,000 gather in Heroes' Square for the historic reburial of former Prime Minister Imre Nagy, who was executed in 1958.
1956statue to former prime minister Imre Nagy was removed by the government -- he's a hero to many for his role in an anti-Communist uprising
62 YEARS AGO (1956) Violence flared between pro-democracy demonstrators and the Red Army in Hungary after new PM, Imre Nagy, promised free elections and economic reforms.
In July 1958, a resolution was moved in the Bombay Municipal Corporation expressing its 'deep regret' about the execution of former Hungarian prime minister Imre Nagy, and its horror at the crime.
They had come for a memorial observance leading to the reburial of Imre Nagy, the martyred leader of the 1956 Revolution.
Orban rose to fame when, in 1989, he stood up and demanded Soviet troops get out of Hungary during a ceremony for the reburial of former prime minister Imre Nagy, who led an anti-Soviet uprising.
A few paces south one finds a statue of Imre Nagy, the executed hero of Hungary's 1956 anti-Soviet revolt, standing on a bridge looking forlornly on parliament.
PEil Maleter and Imre Nagy, who were the symbols of this revolution, were both executed in 1958.
1956: The Hungarian Prime Minister, Imre Nagy, appeals for calm as demonstrators battle with Soviet troops.
Coseley fighter Ryan Corrigan's debut was comfortable and stylish with a 40-37 points success against Hungarian Imre Nagy.
In Hungary, Imre Nagy, who would play a tragic role in 1956, replaced Rakosi, closed Recsk, freed political prisoners, and set the country on a "new course." Elsewhere in the bloc, however, not much changed until February 1956, when Khrushchev delivered his de-Stalinization speech to the 20th Congress of the CPSU.