in situ

(redirected from In situ hybridization)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to In situ hybridization: Fluorescent in situ hybridization

in si·tu

 (ĭn sē′to͞o, sī′-, sĭch′o͞o)
adv. & adj.
In the original position.

[Latin in sitū : in, in + sitū, ablative of situs, place.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in situ

(ɪn ˈsɪtjuː)
adv, adj (postpositive)
1. in the natural, original, or appropriate position
2. (Pathology) pathol (esp of a cancerous growth or tumour) not seen to be spreading from a localized position
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in si•tu

(ɪn ˈsaɪ tu, -tyu, ˈsi-, ˈsɪt u)
adv., adj.
situated in its original or natural place or position.
[1730–40; < Latin in sitū literally, in place]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

in situ

A Latin phrase meaning in position, used to mean in the original or proper place.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.in situ - in the original or natural place or site; "carcinoma in situ"; "the archeologists left the pottery in place"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

in situ

[ɪnˈsɪtjuː] ADVin situ
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

in situ

[ˌɪnˈsɪtjuː]
advin situ
adjin situ invinsofar as in so far as [ˌɪnsəˈfɑːrəz] conj (= inasmuch as) → dans la mesure où
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

in situ

advin situ (esp Med, Archeol); this part can be repaired in situman braucht das Teil nicht auszubauen, um es zu reparieren
adj in situ investigatorErmittler(in) m(f)vor Ort
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

in si·tu

a. L. in situ.
1. en el lugar normal;
2. que no se extiende más allá del sitio en que se origina.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in situ

in situ, localizado
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "In situ Hybridization - Market Analysis, Trends, and Forecasts" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.
(2) Many laboratories have relied on alternative and not clinically validated chromosome 17 fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, which turned into positive almost one half of equivocal cases (30% to 50%), (1, 3, 4) but, because no evidence of therapy efficacy has been reported in this subgroup, the 2018 Expert Panel has taken a strong position against using this approach as a routine strategy.
The product portfolio includes Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Chromogenic in Situ Hybridization probes that are designed and optimized for specific diseases, genes, and/or regions across the entire human or mouse genomes.
Some studies have proposed the combination of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical techniques to evaluate all degrees of amplification of the oncogene Her2/neu and overexpression of its protein c-erbB-2.
Deng et al., "Utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma," Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, vol.
After in situ hybridization technique development by John et al.
The HER2 and chromosome 17 probes are detected by using two-color chromogenic in situ hybridization (ISH) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue.
The most commonly used method to analyze nucleic acids is fluorescence in situ hybridization, but the kind of information accessible for genomes and transcripts can be expanded with padlock probes (3), branched DNA probes (4), and techniques that make use of differentially labeled and designed probes, such as molecular beacons (5) or quantum dot-labeled probes (6).
The programme includes numerous pre conference workshops on December 16th on Good Professional practices in chemical pathology, integrated haem-morphology, Histopathology Cytology-Breast Pathology, clinical application of immunoflourescent assays, Mycology and Biosafety and Fluorescent in situ hybridization.
In some more traditional hospital-based laboratories, for example, there is a need for cytotechnologists to perform tests like fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that determine Her2/neu gene copy number amplification on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast biopsies.
In this study, the molecular cytogenetic characterization of mitotic chromosomes of the Provence flat oyster or dwarf oyster, Ostrea stentina, was performed through Giemsa staining, chromosome measurements, in situ restriction endonuclease banding, C-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization with major ribosomal RNA genes (ITS1), and telomeric sequence [(TTAGGG).sub.n].