inarticulation

inarticulation

(ˌɪnɑːˌtɪkjʊˈleɪʃən)
n
1. (Anatomy) anatomy obsolete the jointing of something into something else, as in a ball-and-socket joint; enarthrosis
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) lack of articulation; incoherent speech
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
page an abyss of inarticulation. Language by extending out in a complex
"Sometimes you whimper / and moan and pretend to cry, / you say, Oh Ari, you make me feel / So many emotions." This inarticulation can be intoxicatingly real.
[...] Surrounded by fetishes and figures of speech: Dog's tooth and whale's tooth, my father's shoe, the dead weight Of winter, the inarticulation of joy ...
Here is evidence that the poetics of inarticulation still have the power to move a reader, even as it demonstrates that language itself is a fraught and perilous means of expressing sincere experience.
Charles's catalog in his poem is distilled, as his readers would expect: "Dog's tooth and whale's tooth, my father's shoe, the dead weight//Of winter, the inarticulation of joy...." Undoubtedly, there were more things in there (he is a big collector of unusual post cards), but this was all he needed to make his point.
In addition, "the mystery of X is a historical moment" a trace left by the "non-literate" the signature or mark on treaties: "The X was contradictory; it indicated inarticulation. These Xs created the reserves" (McMaster 21).
Their difficulties support Terry Roberts's argument that "lack of speech" and the "fundamental and profound inarticulation of the inner self [were] what Wolfe struggled with in writing Look Homeward, Angel" (81).
Faulkner's supposed inarticulation is part of his articulate message.
Borges in this story has Baltasar attempt to bridge the gap of inarticulation and difference only to turn the familiarity of the Gospel against its "interpreter." Baltasar's spontaneous translation of Mark becomes an oral performance of human contact set against the characters' isolation.
This tension between verbal inarticulation and the certainty of a written script informs several scenes throughout the play.
You seem here and in the poem to associate the Etruscans with the "feminine." Rachel Blau DuPlessis clearly associates the Etruscans with that enculturated "feminine" inarticulation in "For the Etruscans." Did you have that essay, as well as D.