tungsten

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tung·sten

 (tŭng′stən)
n. Symbol W
A hard, brittle, corrosion-resistant, gray to white metallic element extracted from wolframite, scheelite, and other minerals, having the highest melting point and lowest vapor pressure of any metal. Tungsten and its alloys are used in high-temperature structural materials and wear-resistant tools and machine parts; in electrical elements, notably lamp filaments; and in instruments requiring thermally compatible glass-to-metal seals. Atomic number 74; atomic weight 183.84; melting point 3,422°C; boiling point 5,555°C; specific gravity 19.3 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Also called wolfram. See Periodic Table.

[Swedish : tung, heavy (from Old Norse thungr) + sten, stone (from Old Norse steinn; see stāi- in Indo-European roots).]

tung·sten′ic (-stĕn′ĭk) adj.

tungsten

(ˈtʌŋstən)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a hard malleable ductile greyish-white element. It occurs principally in wolframite and scheelite and is used in lamp filaments, electrical contact points, X-ray targets, and, alloyed with steel, in high-speed cutting tools. Symbol: W; atomic no: 74; atomic wt: 183.85; valency: 2–6; relative density: 19.3; melting pt: 3422±20°C; boiling pt: 5555°C. Also called: wolfram
[C18: from Swedish tung heavy + sten stone]

tung•sten

(ˈtʌŋ stən)

n.
a rare, bright gray, lustrous metallic element having a high melting point, 3410°C: used in electric-lamp filaments. Symbol: W; at. wt.: 183.85; at. no.: 74; sp. gr.: 19.3.
Also called wolfram.
[1760–70; < Swedish, =tung heavy + sten stone]
tung•sten′ic (-ˈstɛn ɪk) adj.

tung·sten

(tŭng′stən)
Symbol W A hard, gray to white metallic element that is very resistant to corrosion. It has the highest melting point of all elements. Tungsten remains very strong at high temperatures and is used to make light-bulb filaments and to increase the hardness and strength of steel. Atomic number 74. Also called wolfram. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tungsten - a heavy grey-white metallic elementtungsten - a heavy grey-white metallic element; the pure form is used mainly in electrical applications; it is found in several ores including wolframite and scheelite
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
scheelite - a mineral used as an ore of tungsten
iron manganese tungsten, wolframite - a mineral consisting of iron and manganese tungstate in crystalline form; the principal ore of tungsten; found in quartz veins associated with granitic rocks
Translations
wolfram
wolfram
volfram
volframi
volfram
volfrám
þungsteinn
タングステン
wolframium
volframas
wolfram
wolfram
tungstenwolfram
wolfram
volfram
volfram
tungstenvolfram

tungsten

[ˈtʌŋstən] Ntungsteno m

tungsten

[ˈtʌŋstən]
ntungstène m
modif [lamp, light] → au tungstène

tungsten

nWolfram nt

tungsten

[ˈtʌŋstən] ntungsteno
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