incisor

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in·ci·sor

 (ĭn-sī′zər)
n.
A tooth adapted for cutting or gnawing, located at the front of the mouth along the apex of the dental arch.

incisor

(ɪnˈsaɪzə)
n
(Dentistry) a chisel-edged tooth at the front of the mouth. In man there are four in each jaw

in•ci•sor

(ɪnˈsaɪ zər)

n.
any of the four anterior teeth in each jaw, used for cutting and gnawing..
[1665–75; < New Latin]

in·ci·sor

(ĭn-sī′zər)
A tooth having a sharp edge adapted for cutting or gnawing, located in mammals in the front of the mouth between the canine teeth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incisor - a tooth for cutting or gnawingincisor - a tooth for cutting or gnawing; located in the front of the mouth in both jaws
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
Translations
سِن قاطِعَه
řezák
fortand
diente incisivoincisivo
etuhammas
metszőfog
framtönn; nagtönn
門歯
siekacz
sekalec
kesici dişön diş

incisor

[ɪnˈsaɪzəʳ] Nincisivo m

incisor

[ɪnˈsaɪzər] nincisive f

incisor

nSchneidezahn m

incisor

[ɪnˈsaɪzəʳ] n (Anat) → incisivo

incision

(inˈsiʒən) noun
1. a cut, especially one made in a person's body by a surgeon.
2. the act of cutting especially by a surgeon.
incisor (inˈsaizə) noun
one of the four front cutting teeth in the upper or lower jaw.

in·ci·sor

n. diente incisivo.

incisor

n incisivo; upper o maxillary central — incisivo central superior; lower o mandibular lateral — incisivo lateral inferior
References in periodicals archive ?
Distinctive features include large bright orange-yellow incisor teeth that are usually visible and webbed hind feet.
2 Even in cases of severe resorption, the incisor teeth can maintain vitality in the oral cavity if the pulp is non-infective.
The incisor teeth are frequently missing at the mesial mandibular margins.
Again, yes, but elephant tusks are enlarged incisor teeth.
Radiograph revealed osteolytic changes at the roots of the incisor teeth and in adjoining area (Fig.
Rats and mice: the facts | Rats have long incisor teeth which grow continually throughout their life, meaning they must gnaw materials to wear the teeth down, potentially causing problems when they gnaw through wiring or water pipes.
Squirrels have strong upper and lower incisor teeth that grow continuously throughout their lives.
Median alveolar cyst which is present as a cyst separating the upper central incisor teeth.
Confined horses, which have no access to pasture do not use the incisor teeth for shearing, and this may lead to incisor overgrowth because of the lack of attrition and which causes malocclusion over time due to reduced wear of dental occlusion surfaces and restricted range of mandibular excursion.
This article describes a case of replanted maxillary incisor teeth following avulsion due to a road traffic accident.