Incongenial

In`con`gen´ial


a.1.Not congenial; uncongenial.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taylor and Robicheaux, unlike Rebus, do not for a moment consider changing to another denomination, and neither makes much attempt to justify or rationalise his beliefs--for the most part they are simply what they grew up with, although neither hesitates to abandon or ignore those aspects of their faith that they find particularly incongenial. It is not, then, any coincidence that Bruen's and Burke's novels also include the devil as antagonist.
District Judge Michael Payne granted a possession order to the MoD at a hearing in Oxford county court, calling his role "a very incongenial duty".
Here was a philosophical culture that was not only incongenial to received religious thinking, but was in fact deeply corrosive.