chirality

(redirected from Incongruent counterparts)
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chi·ral·i·ty

 (kī-răl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The aspect of a structure or property, such as the configuration of a molecule or the spin of a particle, that renders that structure or property distinguishable from its mirror image or symmetrical opposite. Also called handedness.

chirality

(kaɪˈrælɪtɪ)
n
(Chemistry) the configuration or handedness (left or right) of an asymmetric, optically active chemical compound. Also called: dissymmetry
[C19: from Greek kheir hand + -al1 + -ity]
ˈchiral adj
Translations
chiralité
chiralità
aynallıkkirallik
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Hanna argues that Kant's incongruent counterparts example can be mobilized to show that some mental representations, which represent complex states of affairs as complex, do so entirely nonconceptually.
An unusual feature is a section of tiny, self-contained appendices, on questions as diverse as whether something could be red and green all over; why Kant once argued from incongruent counterparts to absolute space; whether Kant's "synthesis" is a solution to the "binding problem" identified by experimental psychologists.
In 1768 Kant tried to solve the problem of incongruent counterparts by introducing absolute space as a "fundamental concept" in relation to which the hand would be determined as being either left or right.
This paper develops a novel interpretation of Kant's argument from incongruent counterparts to the effect that the representations of space and time are intuitions rather than concepts.