inconsolable

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in·con·sol·a·ble

 (ĭn′kən-sō′lə-bəl)
adj.
Impossible or difficult to console; despondent: was inconsolable after his pet died.

in′con·sol′a·bil′i·ty, in′con·sol′a·ble·ness n.
in′con·sol′a·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inconsolable

(ˌɪnkənˈsəʊləbəl)
adj
incapable of being consoled or comforted; disconsolate
ˌinconˌsolaˈbility, ˌinconˈsolableness n
ˌinconˈsolably adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•con•sol•a•ble

(ˌɪn kənˈsoʊ lə bəl)

adj.
not consolable.
in`con•sol′a•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inconsolable - sad beyond comfortinginconsolable - sad beyond comforting; incapable of being consoled; "inconsolable when her son died"
consolable - able to be consoled
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inconsolable

adjective heartbroken, devastated, despairing, desolate, wretched, heartsick, brokenhearted, sick at heart, prostrate with grief When my mother died I was inconsolable.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
لا يَقْبَل التَّعْزِيَه، لا عَزاء له
neutišitelný
utrøstelig
vigasztal an
óhuggandi
nepaguodžiamas
nenomierināmsneremdināms
neutíšiteľný
avutulamaz

inconsolable

[ˌɪnkənˈsəʊləbl] ADJinconsolable
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inconsolable

[ˌɪnkənˈsəʊləbəl] adjinconsolable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inconsolable

adjuntröstlich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inconsolable

[ˌɪnkənˈsəʊləbl] adjinconsolabile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

inconsolable

(inkənˈsəulebl) adjective
not able to be comforted. the inconsolable widow.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mania may manifest as irritability, aggression, rages, or inconsolability. Children with either Bipolar I or II (not otherwise specified or NOS) should be referred to a mental health specialist.
All patients between 1 month and 18 years of age presenting to the ED-MNH with abdominal pain (including abdominal distension and related complaints such as passing currant jelly stool, drawing up of legs, and inconsolability) and whose parent or guardian consented were enrolled in our study.
More recently, Groves, Traube, and Silver (2016) reported on three infants with corrected gestational ages of 4, 11, and 17 weeks who exhibited delirium symptoms, including agitation, inconsolability, poor sleep, and restlessness.
in its very inconsolability. The ruthless bluntness of it.
She writes that, "Remaining in inconsolability is a way of listening to 'the silent cry'." (41) The only way to live in our post-modern world, for Soelle, is to resist the comfort of apathy, and instead cultivate our connection with the ineffable.
In Handke's recasting of the legendary libertine's adventures, we find the Don characterized by sadness, an "inconsolability" that is, ironically, the source of his invulnerability.
Pain out of proportion to injury, inconsolability, increasing analgesic requirement, progressive neurological deficit or significant swelling in an immobilised or paralysed limb have been suggested as presentations in children that should arouse the suspicions of the clinician.
Behavioral dysregulation (DeGangi, 2000) refers to a constellation of behaviors that includes irritability (frequent fussing and crying), inconsolability (continued distress behaviors despite adult interventions), eating problems (such as food refusal), demandingness (frequent requests for adult behaviors, such as holding), poor mood regulation (unpredictable changes from one affect state to another and difficulty maintaining a positive mood state), poor attention regulation (frequent attention shifts), high arousal (high activity, distress, or tension), and sleep disturbances (such as night waking or irregular sleep patterns).