tachycardia

(redirected from Increased heart rate)
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tach·y·car·di·a

 (tăk′ĭ-kär′dē-ə)
n.
A rapid heart rate, especially one above 100 beats per minute in an adult.

[tachy- + Greek kardiā, heart; see cardia.]

tach′y·car′di·ac (-dē-ăk) adj. & n.

tachycardia

(ˌtækɪˈkɑːdɪə)
n
(Pathology) pathol abnormally rapid beating of the heart, esp over 100 beats per minute. Compare bradycardia
tachycardiac adj

tach•y•car•di•a

(ˌtæk ɪˈkɑr di ə)

n.
excessively rapid heartbeat.

tachycardia

abnormally rapid beating of the heart.
See also: Heart
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tachycardia - abnormally rapid heartbeat (over 100 beats per minute)
arrhythmia, cardiac arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart
Translations
tachykardie

tachycardia

[ˌtækɪˈkɑːdɪə] Ntaquicardia f

tachycardia

nHerzjagen nt, → Tachykardie f (spec)

tach·y·car·di·a

n. taquicardia, aceleración de la actividad cardíaca, gen. a una frecuencia de más de 100 por minuto en una persona adulta;
atrial ______ auricular;
ectopic ______ ectópica;
en salves ______ en salves;
exophthalmic ______ exoftálmica;
fetal ______ fetal;
paroxysmal atrial ______ auricular paroxística;
reflex ______ refleja;
sinus ______ sinusal;
supraventricular ______ supraventricular;
ventricular ______ ventricular.

tachycardia

n taquicardia; paroxysmal supraventricular — taquicardia paroxística supraventricular
References in periodicals archive ?
After seizures without PCCA, increased heart rate was accompanied by increased serum 5-HT levels compared with those with PCCA.
The cold shock reaction to a sudden dip in temperature can cause responses in the human body including involuntary gasping for breath, hyperventilating and increased heart rate - and can lead to heart attack or drowning.
Pets may be suffering from heat exhaustion if they exhibit symptoms such as frequent vomiting; disorientation; collapse; excessive panting and/or distressed breathing; extreme thirst; increased heart rate; weakness and/or fatigue; or thickened saliva.
The excitement of the video game might have caused a surge in adrenaline, causing tachycardia (increased heart rate) and cardiac arrest," The Times of India quoted cardiologist Ashok Jain, who examined Furkan, as saying.
Your increased heart rate could pose a health risk as energy drinks have been shown to raise stress levels, increase blood pressure, and(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20103032) thickens your blood.
Al-Ishaq said in addition to causing family conflict, uncontrolled anger and anxiety have long-term negative physical effects and can cause increased heart rate, high blood pressure, narrowing of blood vessels, and increased clotting, all of which can be heart attack triggers.
After 50-60 seconds, the sympathetic nervous system kicks in, stimulating activity such as increased heart rate via adrenalin release, which prepares the body to react to a stressful situation.
'The heat can lead to increased heart rate, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing, frailty and loss of muscle control, and unconsciousness.
Participants, several of whom vomited, were asked about their hangover the following day and given a score on a so-called Acute Hangover Scale, based on factors including thirst, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, stomachache, increased heart rate and loss of appetite.
Heart attacks are, after all, synonymous with increased heart rate, the exact goal one works toward when they work out.
Smokers, or people exposed to second-hand smoke from tobacco products, have increased levels of carbon monoxide in the blood which can lead to shortness of breath and an increased heart rate, along with numerous other diseases and health conditions.
Chocolate contains theobromine, a stimulant similar to caffeine, which can cause vomiting, increased heart rate, agitation and seizures in dogs.

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