Inculpably


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In`cul´pa`bly


adv.1.Blamelessly.
References in periodicals archive ?
29) Gerald O'Collins, in his comment on the importance of this passage, points to another passage in Ad gentes that references Hebrews 11:6: "Therefore though God in ways known to Himself can lead those inculpably ignorant of the Gospel to find that faith without which it is impossible to please Him (Heb.
Vatican II recognized that salvation is possible for those who are inculpably outside the church, and there are various reasons why a person might be considered to be inculpably outside the church.
8) Vatican II's extension of the possibility of salvation to non-Christians is thus predicated on the sine qua non of their being inculpably (sine culpa) ignorant of one or more of these realities: the Church, Christ and--in the case of atheists--the existence of God (or, perhaps more accurately, inculpably ignorant of their own obligations in light of these realities).
My examples focus principally on atheists (understood here in the broad, value-neutral sense of those without a belief in the existence of a God or gods), since these have most to be inculpably ignorant about.
Nor am I implying that all those who have neither entered nor persevered are, as a matter of fact, inculpably ignorant (Gaudium et spes no.
Berger and Luckmann's theory of plausibility structures, I have argued, justifies a very wide hope that many of today's unbelievers are indeed inculpably ignorant of the gospel, the Church, and perhaps even of God himself.
In cases where the first marriage was presumably valid, the draft offered the possibility of leaving persons in "good faith" or "good conscience" about their continued cohabitation, and admitting them to the sacraments, even when their consciences were inculpably erroneous or perplexed.