indagator

Related to indagator: Indagation

indagator

(ˈɪndəˌɡeɪtə)
n
an investigator
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References in periodicals archive ?
Romanorum; proximus Tranquillus, rerum curiosissimus indagator; tertium
Moenen R (2012) De broedparasiet Cacoxenus indagator (Drosophilidae) en de parasitoiden Melittobia acasta (Eulophidae) en Coelopencyrtus sp.
Indagator: Investigating perceived gratifications of an application that blends mobile content sharing with gameplay.
(cuppes, auarus, elegans, despoliATOR, /latebricolarum hominum corrumpTOR, / blandus inops, celatum indagATOR): despoliator neol.
The first is to extend current research in mobile content sharing games through the design and implementation of Indagator (a Latin word for explorer).
Section 3 introduces Indagator and highlights its key content sharing and gaming features.
Indagator is an application that combines gaming elements into mobile content sharing activities.
At its core, Indagator is a mobile content-sharing application.
Las actividades de que nos dan cuenta los indagator!ados no pueden ser calificadas de !licitas porque en ningun momento quebrantaron la ley penal, por ello es forzoso reconocer su inocencia y declararla de conformidad con lo dispuesto por el art.
In late 1793 and early 1794, a Gentleman's Magazine correspondent signing himself 'Indagator' published two letters which amounted to a slur on the character of Mark Akenside, the then-famous poct of The Pleasures of Imagination.(1) 'Indagator' claimed that in 1744, early in his professional career as a doctor, Akenside had resorted to dishonourable tactics in trying to entice away the clients of James (later Sir James) Stonhouse, who had been a resident medical practitioner in Northampton since the previous year.
It is unclear whether Doddridge's carefully worded protests against such conduct had the effect of diverting Stonhouse from his plan; and no record (beyond the vague aspersions of 'Indagator') remains of how Akenside conducted himself in his attempt to carve out a practice for himself in Northampton.
In sum, 'Indagator's' refusal to produce any evidence to support his claims, his disapproval of Akenside's politics and what he assumes to be his religious views, and his unqualified support for Stonhouse, combine radically to compromise his reliability; while Doddridge's letter shows that Stonhouse at least considered the possibility of using dirty tricks in competing with Akenside for patients in Northampton.