indenting


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in·dent 1

 (ĭn-dĕnt′)
v. in·dent·ed, in·dent·ing, in·dents
v.tr.
1. To set (the first line of a paragraph, for example) in from the margin.
2.
a. To cut or tear (a document with two or more copies) along an irregular line so that the parts can later be matched for establishing authenticity.
b. To draw up (a document) in duplicate or triplicate.
3.
a. To notch or serrate the edge of; make jagged.
b. To make notches, grooves, or holes in (wood, for example) for the purpose of mortising.
c. To fit or join together by or as if by mortising.
4. Chiefly British To order (goods) by purchase order or official requisition.
v.intr.
1. To make or form an indentation.
2. Chiefly British To draw up or order an indent.
n. (ĭn-dĕnt′, ĭn′dĕnt′)
1. The act of indenting or the condition of being indented.
2. A blank space before the beginning of an indented line: a two-pica indent.
3. An indenture.
4. A US certificate issued at the close of the American Revolution for interest due on the public debt.
5. Chiefly British An official requisition or purchase order for goods.

[Middle English endenten, to notch, from Anglo-Norman and Old French endenter, both from Medieval Latin indentāre : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin dēns, dent-, tooth; see dent- in Indo-European roots.]

in·dent 2

 (ĭn-dĕnt′)
tr.v. in·dent·ed, in·dent·ing, in·dents
To impress (a design, for example); stamp.
n. (ĭn-dĕnt′, ĭn′dĕnt′)
An indentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leaders of the Bangladesh Indenting Agents Association (BIAA) today urged the Industries Ministry for launching a patent coordination cell to protect the ownership of the country's industrial innovation, reports BSS.
It is found that the failure modes of front face turn from the pitting failure to indenting failure with the increase of stand-off distance and that those of back face turn from the pitting failure and petalling failure to the global dome failure (Mode I failure).