independent clause

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Related to Independent clauses: subordinate clauses

independent clause

An independent clause (also known as a main clause) is a clause that forms a complete, independent thought. Like all clauses, an independent clause contains a subject and a predicate (which consists of a verb and any related information).
An independent clause does not require anything else to be considered complete, and so it can stand alone as a sentence. This is known as a simple sentence.
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independent clause

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

independent clause

n
(Grammar) grammar a main or coordinate clause. Compare dependent clause
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.independent clause - a clause in a complex sentence that can stand alone as a complete sentence
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

independent clause

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Avoid dependent or independent clauses, that is, until you have enough to find your way through the maze of sentences within sentences.
(ICE-GH:W2A-001#18) (A MULTI-CLAUSAL SENTENCE WITH THREE COORDINATED INDEPENDENT CLAUSES)
Handley, please note I used a semicolon while joining independent clauses with "however.")
"Sure, you can memorize the fact that a semicolon shows a close connection between two independent clauses. But when you see ol' Sheriff Semicolon amblin' out there with his lasso - aimin' to wrangle together a couple of independent clauses - not only are you going to connect more deeply with that information, but you're also going to have more fun doing it."
We also start to see how a long adverbial and a simple independent clause or even two short independent clauses and a longer independent clause may be prosodically equivalent; that is, according to the prosodic hierarchy, they may be equivalent prosodic units, and share similar tempo and duration, despite their not being syntactic equivalents.
* separate independent clauses with a period and, if necessary, a capital letter;
In Mo-Tires, the issue was whether a semi-colon (or a period in the French version) at the end of the paragraph created two separate independent clauses, or whether the semi-colon merely constituted a pause in a single clause.
Similarly, one of the starnest edicts issued by modern usage pundits concerns the comma splice, in which a comma separates two independent clauses. Supposedly, this is too weak a punctuation mark for the purpose and should be replaced with a full stop or semi-colon.
In Livonian, the reported indicative can occur in various types of subordinate clauses, in independent clauses, or in main clauses.
As expected, I found that complex relations are frequently expressed by the juxtaposition of two independent clauses, relying on the pragmatic context for clarification.

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