independent living

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independent living

n.
1. A living arrangement that maximizes independence and self-determination, especially of disabled persons living in a community instead of in a medical facility.
2. A social movement asserting that people with disabilities should have the same civil rights and life choices as people without disabilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
As White wrote in a recent Access Alaska newsletter, stories such as Gilroy's, as well as Thomas' and Frank's tales, illustrate there has been great progress since Ed Roberts founded the independent living movement at UC Berkeley in the early 1960s and lawmakers enacting the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.
Ed Roberts, the Rolling Quads and the Independent Living Movement
One hundred of the oral histories of Willa Baum's legacy are the personal narratives of the little-known but important Disability Rights and Independent Living Movement (DRILM) that began in the 1960s.
Disability Rights and People with Physical Disabilities: Independent Living Movement
The theory that supports the independent living movement is based on both of these feminist principles.
This participant's manual is part of a training program sponsored by IL NET, a national training and technical assistance project working to strengthen the independent living movement. It is intended to teach participants what the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) law and regulations require, how to do transition planning and the development of an Individualized Education Program (IEP), what the right to learn really means and its relevance to individual state regulations, how maximum integration can take place, and how disability rights advocates can affect change in the education system.
The independent living movement was established in the early 1970's largely by people with disabilities in response to these circumstances (DeJong, 1979).
Gatekeepers also represent a fundamental problem in that it is at odds with the independent living movement, which emphasizes choice and personal responsibility.
In its broadest implications, the independent living movement is the civil rights movement for millions of Americans with disabilities.
For Centers for Independent Living (CILs) in New Jersey, raising awareness for the community of people with disabilities has always been a part of the Independent Living Movement since the 1970s.

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