Index Librorum Prohibitorum


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Index Librorum Prohibitorum

(ˈɪndɛks laɪˈbrɔːrʊm prəʊˌhɪbɪˈtɔːrʊm)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church (formerly) an official list of proscribed books. Often called: the Index
[C17, literally: list of forbidden books]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In line with this thinking, the Catholic Church has maintained for centuries a list of authors and their offensive literary works in a standard index known as Index Librorum Prohibitorum (Martinez de Bujanda, 2002).
Al contrario, non molti finora si sono occupati di approfondire gli sviluppi e le prerogative assunte dall'Index librorum prohibitorum nel Novecento.
In order to answer these questions and get a sense of what this part of his library might mean for education in nineteenth-century Newfoundland, it is first necessary to understand something of the history of the Index librorum prohibitorum or the Roman Index of Forbidden Books, as it is more commonly known.
Su opus fusius es la obra de doce volumenes, que, en cierto modo, culmina--aqui, en este XIIo tomo de gran recopilacion--su trabajo de anos, y expone a la luz del sol una de las grandes entregas de asunto inquisitorial: el Index librorum prohibitorum.
The works of Aretino, for example, joined the works of Kepler, Martin Luther, Copernicus, and Boccaccio, in being among the Vatican's first Index Librorum Prohibitorum (List of Forbidden Books), but nevertheless, copies circulated like wildfire in cities across Europe.
L'Index librorum prohibitorum--aussi appele Index expurgatorius, Index librorum prohibitorum juxta exemplar romanum jussu sanctissimi domini nostri--est une liste d'ouvrages que les catholiques romains n'etaient pas autorises a lire, des << livres pernicieux >>, accompagnee des regles de l'Eglise au sujet des livres.
It has been used as a container for many things, including calendars and almanacs, business ledgers, fashion magazines, catalogs of garden seeds and auto parts, lists of names and telephone numbers, and editions of the Index librorum prohibitorum. There is no reason other than convenience, or maybe lack of imagination, why such nonbooks and antibooks should ever have appeared in bookish guise.
The "Index librorum prohibitorum" was launched in 1557 and wasn't discontinued until 1966.