Indexically


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In`dex´ic`al`ly


adv.1.In the manner of an index.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, understanding other parts of the play's dialogue as working indexically in a straightforward manner is critical commonplace, with particular lines of dialogue taken to indicate the likely existence of stage props mentioned.
To distinguish such material mentions from "pure" icons, Peirce used the term "hypoicon," an indexically captured sign.
These signifiers also operate indexically as the relationship between them and the infant is causal not given.
Unlike Rauhfaser Royal, which turns an actual piece of wallpaper into an image, here the image is a photographic representation, which does not relate indexically to the specific wall segment on which it hangs, since Sander uses the same photograph in all the frames.
Cloth, $69.00--Linda Zagzebski's aim in this book is to construct a comprehensive and novel ethical theory "out of a single point of origin." That single point is exemplars, "the people we admire upon reflection." Borrowing heavily from the work of Hilary Putnam and Saul Kripke on the theory of direct reference, Zagzebski maintains that an exemplar is one who is like that, "where that is the object of admiration." Putnam and Kripke argued that natural kind terms such as "water" or "gold" refer to whatever is the same stuff as that, where "that" refers to some instance indexically identified, most simply by pointing.
This "nostalgia for context," Stewart suggests, elicits a "counterfeit materiality" that attempts to evoke that context indexically. Yet nineteenth-century literary ballads are rarely characterized by a rubricated authenticity of material form, existing somewhere, as it were, between modernization and antiquarianism.
Whether the textual element is part of the image or points to it indexically from the outside, as it were, remains very much in question.
Heshima can be considered a 'multiplex sign' (Briggs 1988): an ideological notion that not merely refers to but indexically calls upon a whole social system--an entire social order associated with the past (Hill 1998: 266).
The exposed film not only (indexically) represents the photographed objects or the scene but also represents (indexically and metonymically) a camera because it has been a part of the apparatus.
The enmeshed dimension TimeSpace is objectified in everyday communication through semiotization processes which are reflexive in nature: our daily interactional encounters and the TimeSpace moves they entail indexically point to the social order, different centers of authority, patterns and valorizing systems (i.e.